Miners Memorial Documentation

Miners Memorial Book Cover

The following information is a collection of obituaries, newspaper articles, mine reports and other documents that were collected during the research process while gathering names for the Miner Memorial. In order for a miner to have his name on the memorial he had to have died in a coal mine accident or from injuries received in a coal mine accident in Carbon County. Currently there are 1350 miners listed on the memorial with two additional names to be added. The names of these miners can be found on this page: Miners Memorial.

This information was included in a book and was published for the dedication (7 Sep 2015) of the memorial and contained information about each of the miners. The book is no longer available, in book form, but is available in PDF form on a CD. If you are interested in obtaining a copy of the CD please e-mail Kathy Hamaker.. Special thanks is given to Doris Prettyman for compiling all the information for the book, the CD and for this webpage.

Additional information will be added about the miners as it becomes available. If you are related to any of these miners and have information, stories or photos of them that you are willing to donate please e-mail Kathy Hamaker.



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Acroterjianakis, Erakles (Acroterianakis, E.)
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1918-1920 - page 278

E. Acroterianakis, a Greek, was killed March 7, 1919; Winter Quarters Mine, by a bounce which occurred in No. 1 room on the fifth level of the 11 raise. A rock fell on him weighing about 2 tons, which killed him instantly. This place had been inspected by the fire boss about 45 minutes before the accident and found to be in good condition, except for a prop that was needed on the right hand side, which he told them to put up but they neglected to do so.

Adams, Gus (Gustave)
Salt Lake Tribune May 6, 1923
Machine Man Killed in Mutual Coal Mine

Gus Adams, 38 years of age, a machine man, was crushed to death by a falling roof yesterday in the Mutual Coal company mine in Spring Canyon, Carbon county. He is survived by his wife and five children, who live at Mutual. Irvin Anderson, Adam's helper, was seriously injured in the same accident. He was removed to the hospital at Rains.

The Sun May 11, 1923
LIFE IS CRUSHED OUT AT THE MINES AT MUTUAL

Gust Adams, a machine man up at the Mutual mines in Spring Canyon and 38 years of age, was crushed to death there by a falling roof last Monday. Irvin Anderson, his helper, was seriously injured. The latter was removed to the hospital at Rains. The body of Adams was brought to Flynn Funeral Home at Price and taken to Castle Dale for burial last Thursday. He is survived by a wife and three small children-a boy and two girls. Deceased was a member of the Elks at Provo. W. E. Andrews, past exalted ruler of the lodge at the Garden City, and James Rooney, also a member of the order, were at the services here Wednesday evening last. They were largely attended by friends of the family and local Elks.

Adams, James Augustus Page
Salt Lake Tribune 10-11-1951

Dragerton, Carbon County - Funeral services for James A. Adams, 55, who died in a mine accident at Kaiser Steel Corp. Sunnyside No. 2 mine Friday, will be conducted Thursday at 4:15 p.m. in East Carbon Junior High School building here by Orlon Mortensen, bishop of Dragerton Ward, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was born Sept. 3, 1896, at St. George, Washington County, the son of John Smith and Mary Elizabeth Adair Adams.

He was married to Rose May Lazenby at Salt Lake City Sept. 2, 1927.

Besides his widow of Dragerton, he is survived by four sons, James J. Adams, U S Army in Korea; Pfc, John D. Adams, March Air Force Base, Cal.; Vee M. Adams and Robert Mack Adams, both of Dragerton; two brothers, John Bennett Adams and Hiram L. Adams, both of Siguard; six sisters, Mrs. Ada Reed, Majera, Cal.; Mrs. Armenis Hathway;, Nampa, Id; Mrs. Mary Elder, Springville, Mrs. Rebecca Dickenson, Richfield; Mrs. Sue Emma Roberts, Annabella, and Mrs. Viola Lambert, Sparks, Nevada.

Friends may call at the place of services from 1 p.m. Thursday until time of services. Burial will be in Manti City Cemetery, Friday under direction of Mitchell Funeral Home of Price.

Ogden Standard Examiner 10-5-1951
Miner Fatally Crushed Under Tons of Coal

Sunnyside, Utah, Oct. 5 -- James Adams, 55, Sunnyside, was crushed to death yesterday beneath 70 tons of coal at Sunnyside No. 2 mine of Kaiser Steel Corp.

Details of the accident were not immediately available, but it was reported that Adams was working in an area previously mined when pressure burst a column of coal left as a ceiling support, and the ceiling caved in.

A force of 270 miners worked all day digging through the debris to recover the body.

L. L. Arnett of Price, state mine inspector, will investigate the mishap. The mine will be closed pending his findings.

Adams, Orson William Sr.
The News Advocate - April 15, 1926 (as recorded in Find-A-Grave.com)
Miner Killed In Cave-In at Consumers Mutual

Orson William Adams, 40, was instantly killed Wednesday night by a fall of coal in the Consumer's Mutual Coal company's mine near Gibson mine, twelve miles west of here.

Mr. Adams was born August 30, 1885, at Escalante, Utah, the son of Gilbert M. Adams and Millie Allen Adams. About a year ago he moved to Gibson mine and has since been employed by the Consumers Company. His widow and five children, Orson, George, Thelma, LaPreal, and Marion survive. Funeral services will be held in the chapel of the Wallace and Harmon undertaking parlors Sunday afternoon.

Adda, John
Salt Lake Deseret Evening News, March 7, 1916
KILLED IN BLACK HAWK MINE AT HIAWATHA

Price, March 6 - John Adda, an Italian coal miner, was killed today in the Black Hawk mine at Hiawatha. When he fell from a mine car loaded with coal, which was being drawn to the main entry of the mine, the car ran over his body. He was 30 years old and single. A brother, Mat Adda, lives at Christopher, Ill. The body was brought to Price this afternoon.

Aeillo, Vincenzo (James)
1912 Biennial Mine Report - page 115

James Aeillo, Italian, machine runner's helper, aged 24 years, single, was injured in room No. 2, third west entry, No. 1 mine, Hiawatha, November 21st, 1912, from which effects he died at the hospital, Salt Lake City, November 26th. Aeillo was employed as machine runner's helper on a chain cutting machine on the above date. The machine was cutting about the center of the room, when a slab of coal burst out from the center of the face of room, falling over towards Aeillo. In his efforts to get away from the falling coal, he fell, and the coal caught him across the body, injuring him internally.

Aho, Juko Oskari
1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

Oscar Aho, age 45, laborer at Kenilworth mine, died September 6, 1916 due to electric wires. He was married and has 3 children.

Aicaguerre (Alcaguirre), John
The Salt Lake Telegram 11-9-1925
THREE KILLED IN COAL MINES - Workers in Carbon County Properties Are Victims

PRICE - Nov. 9 - Three miners were killed when loose coal in which they were working fell from the roofs of the coal rooms.

John Alcaguirre, 33, was working at Mutual mine last Thursday, when he was killed by a cave-in. Joe Rossi, 50, a Spring Canyon miner, another victim of a cave-in, died Friday night from injuries suffered Thursday. Both men were unmarried. Alcaguirre was a native of France. He is survived by one brother, Eugene, a resident of Price.

Leo L. Whitby, 27, was killed by a cave-in of coal in the Standardville mine Friday. He was a resident of Helper, but a native of Marion, Idaho. He is survived by his widow, Blanche B. Whitby, and one daughter. His body was sent to Salt Lake Sunday, where interment will take place. Funeral services were held at Helper.

Aimo, Batista
Biennial Report of the State Coal mine inspector 1901-02

Batista Aimo, a miner, was killed in Castle Gate Mine No. 1, on the 20th day of December, 1901. He was mining coal on the corner of pillar between 3 and 4 rooms on fourth level, off the tenth rise, when a piece of coal fell and struck him on the head and back, causing fractured skull and the tissues over the entire back were lacerated and contused, from which wounds he died 15 minutes later. Following is a report of the coroner's jury:

State of Utah, County of Carbon, Castle Gate Precinct

At an inquest held in Castle Gate, the 20th of December, 1901, before Justice of the Peace Lamph, upon the body of Batista Aimo, the undersigned jurors upon their oath do say that said Batista Aimo came to his death by a bounce of coal and not having the same spragged or propped resulted in his death.

After hearing all testimony and evidence in the above case, we, the jurors, return a verdict of accidental death, exonerating all parties from blame for said accident.

Eastern Utah Advocate 1901-12-26

Batisto Aimo, an Italian miner, was killed at Castle Gate, last Friday, a quantity of rock falling on him. An inquest before Justice Lamph attached no blame to the company.

Albarado, Nito
SL Tribune 3-1-1951
Rock Fall Blamed in Deaths

Price - Two Sunnyside coal miners, Antonio (Tony) Lopez, 24, and Nito Albarado, 52, were killed by falling rock Tuesday afternoon while trying to make an air course of the mine safe, according to R. J. Schultz, Price, state mine inspector.

The two men had cleared away loose ruBle on the mine floor and were ready to set a timber prop in place to strengthen the mine ceiling when an 18-inch thick cap rock fell, killing them, Mr. Schultz said.

He said it is mine practice to keep all air courses clean and free of fallen rock and coal to facilitate air passage and use of the tunnel as an emergency exit if needed.

Mr. Schultz said the area of the mine where the men were killed was shaken by a mine explosion in 1945 and the ceiling there was known to be loose and dangerous.

Awaiting word from relatives, funeral arrangements were pending for the two miners killed.

Albino, Ivona
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1903-1904 page 42 and 43

Ivona Albino, a native of Italy, a miner, age 27, was killed in the Castle Gate Mine. Albino at the time of the accident was working, taking out a pillar, when a rock fell from the roof upon him, killing him instantly, the rock weighing over two tons.

Copy of Inquest: That said Ivona Albino came to his death by a fall of rock in his working place, in the Castle Gate Mine, on September 9, 1903 and that no blame or negligence can be attached to the Pleasant Valley Coal Company.

Alexander, Prince
Story written by Betty Jo Hartley, August 24, 1997 taken from News Advocate of Thursday, March 13, 1924 page 8.
Former Negro Preacher Breaks down Prejudice

One of the miners killed in the Castle Gate Mine explosion, known as Prince Alexander, was a well-educated black man, formerly a preacher, who came to Castle Gate in 1914. He was always smiling and jolly but dignified. He was at first the butt of much "kidding" when he came to work in the coal camp on account of his faultless manners and never failing politeness.

When the flu epidemic hit the camp in 1919, and the vain cry for nurses went out, Prince Alexander proved himself one of the Saviors of the camp. Night and day, without thought for himself, he spent his strength nursing the sick who would otherwise have been without help. After that episode the Prince's courtesy was no longer the subject for joking in Castle Gate.

At that time there was much prejudices among the coal camps and black men were not buried inside the cemetery when their life was complete. Prince Alexander due to his Christ like character and service earned the right to be buried inside the Castle Gate cemetery after his death in the Castle Gate Mine explosion.

Thanks to this Christ like man my grandparent's lives were saved and enriched by his association and compassion. They were among the many inflicted with the flu. Prince Alexander cleaned their home, gathered their wood and coal and brought them water. He was very good to them. I look forward to meeting Prince Alexander in the eternities!

Alger, Terrance Mayo
Ogden Standard Examiner 7-20-1954
Two Dragerton Miners Killed; Magna Boy, Infant Drowned

Four Utahns met violent deaths yesterday.

Two Dragerton coal miners were killed by a falling slab of coal, and a 14 year old Magna boy and a 2 year old California infant were drowned.

The two coal miners who were killed in the Horse Canyon in of the Columbia Geneva Steel Division, U S Steel Corp., were Lester Fowler and Mayo Alger. A wall of coal collapsed, pinning them against a loading machine. No other miners were hurt.

Allison, James Henderson
The Ogden Standard Examiner Wed. Feb. 20, 1929
TIPPLE MECHANIC DIES OF INJURIES

STANDARDVILLE, Feb. 20 - James Allison, 34, tipple mechanic at the Standard Coal company mines at Standardville, died at the Standardville hospital Tuesday of injuries sustained while at work Monday.

Allison was working in front of a car at the dump, when another car came rolling toward him. He misjudged the speed of the oncoming car and was pinned between the two cars.

Allison was unmarried. He leaves three brothers.

Allred, Charles William (C.W.)
Report of Industrial Commission of Utah July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922
Page 930 - FATAL ACCIDENTS

C. W. Allred, an American, 26 years old and single, was killed October 23, 1920, Black Hawk Mine, by a fall of rock 5 feet wide, 7 feet 4 inches long and from 3 to 5 inches thick, thinning out to 3/8 inch. He and his partner knew the day before the accident that this rock was loose and had figured out that when their shots went off to bring down the top coal it would also bring down the rock. On the morning of the accident there was six feet of loose coal under this loose rock. They took down the loose coal and when they heard the motorman coming with an empty car from them they started to clean the loose coal off the track, when all of a sudden the rock fell, striking Allred and injuring him so seriously that he died 2 hours after the accident.

Allred, David William
SL Tribune August 13, 1936
Miner, 49, Killed by Falling Coal

PRICE - Funeral services for David William Allred, Sr. 49, who was killed instantly in a fall of coal at Castlegate mine No. 2 late Monday, will be conducted at Leota Friday. He will be buried at LaPoint.

Following the accident, Allred's body was immediately extricated by fellow workmen, but it is believed his neck was broken.

Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Arvis Jabe Allred; a daughter, Carma, 9, Castlegate; five children by a previous marriage, Mrs. Wilma Clark, Ouray, Colo; Mrs. Almenda McKenna, Roosevelt; Mrs. Fannie McKenna, Fort Duchesne, and David and George Allred, Castlegate, and a brother J. W. Allred, St. David, Arizona.

Allred, Harry Adelbert
Salt Lake Tribune May 6, 1929
Body of Miner Arrives at Home

MT. PLEASANT - The body of Harry Allred, who was killed in a mine accident at Castle Gate Saturday afternoon, was brought to Mt. Pleasant Sunday afternoon. Funeral services will be held in the North ward chapel Wednesday at 2 p.m. Interment will be in Spring City.

In addition to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Allred; his widow, Mrs. Demris Smith Allred, and two little daughters, Bonnie and Betty, Mr. Allred is survived by the following brothers and sisters; Mrs. Vera Petersen of Salt Lake, Mrs. Frank Hall and Miss Anne Allred of Los Angeles, Mrs. Wilford Jensen of Milburn, Ray Allred of Standardville, Mrs. Mont Sperry of Nephi, William, Virgil, Zola, Ida, Vida and Maxine Allred, all of Mt. Pleasant.

Allridge, Charles Raymond
FamilySearch.org

Ray and Ora Jensen came down from National to tell them (the family) what happened. They said that Raymond was working in the mine with two other men. They were all standing close together with Raymond in the middle. A big rock had fallen from the top of the mine and struck Raymond on the head, and even though he had on a hard hat, it killed him instantly.

The funeral was on November 8, 1933. They brought his body home to their own house where there was a viewing. Raymond had many friends so he had a large funeral. He was buried in the Ferron cemetery.

Research note: Age 36, died November 4, 1933, due to skull fracture from a roof fall at the National Mine.

Almazan, (Alamazan), Simon
Report of Industrial Commission 1924 Claim No. 817 decision rendered February 11, 1924

Canto G. Alamazon, alleged brother of Simon G. Alamazon, deceased, applicant, vs. Independent Coal and Coke Company, defendant.

Alleged, that on January 31, 1923, Simon G. Alamazon was injured by accident arising out of or in the course of his employment by defendant company; that as a result of said injury he died on February 8, 1923; that applicant is a brother of decedent and on the date of said injury was partially dependent upon decedent for his maintenance and support.

Defendant admitted that on the 31st day of January, 1923, Simon G. Alamazon was injured by accident arising out of or in the course of his employment and that as a result of said injury he died on the 8th day of February, 1923.

Held, that applicant was not physically or mentally incapacitated from earning his own living and that on the date of the fatal injury to Simon G. Alamazon was in no way dependent upon decedent for his maintenance and support; that no claim, other than the claim of applicant, has been filed with the commission within one year from the date of the death of deceased.

Applicant's claim for compensation denied; defendant ordered to pay $995.20 into the State Treasury.

Alonzo, Gustavo
Sun Advocate July 24, 1997Carbon SO Investigates Fatal Accident at Railco

An industrial accident Monday afternoon at the Railco coal loading facility south of Price in Carbon County claimed the life of a 37-year-old worker.

Wellington Rescue 5 members responded to the scene at approximately 2 p.m. and administered emergency medical treatment to the critically injured Railco employee, confirmed Carbon County Chief Deputy Mike Martinez during an interview with the Sun Advocate.

The chief deputy and county medical examiner identified the victim as Gustavo Alonzo.

Rescue personnel managed to keep the man alive during transport by ambulance to Castleview. But shortly after arriving at the hospital, the Railco worker succumbed to injuries incurred in the industrial mishap.

Alonzo was working in a dimly lit area when the fatal accident occurred.

"The only lighting came from the sun outside," commented the chief deputy and county medical examiner.

The Railco employee apparently became trapped between a roller and a conveyor belt located beneath the truck dumping area at the coal-loading operation.

The mishap resulted in the victim's arms being severed at the shoulders as well as a large open wound in the Railco worker's chest.

In order to gain access into the fatal industrial accident scene, the chief deputy pointed out that emergency personnel and investigators had to walk along a narrow metal rail while maintaining their balance by holding onto an overhead pipe.

In addition to the massive injuries, the preliminary investigation into the July 21 incident indicated blood loss also contributed to Alonzo's death, added Martinez.

Briefly discussing the victim, the chief deputy indicated that Alonzo and several fellow employees reportedly resided in a single-wide trailer at the Railco coal-loading site.

The accident victim is survived by a wife who is five months pregnant along with two children. The Railco employee's three immediate family members currently reside in Casa Grande, Mexico.

Following the fatal mishap, Martinez indicated that local investigators arranged to transfer Alonzo's body to the Utah Medical Examiner's Office in Salt Lake City for examination and final determination of the exact cause of death.

The fatal industrial accident remains under investigation by the county sheriff's office, the state medical examiner and the United States Occupational and Health Safety Administration, concluded Martinez.

Amano, Jujiro (Nakamiura, J.)
The Sun June 7, 1918
JAPANESE MINER KILLED

J. Nakamiura, a Japanese miner who had been employed about the camps of Carbon county for about seven years since first coming to this country, was killed at Sunnyside last Friday evening by a fall of rock and coal. Deceased was about 34 years of age and leaves a wife and several children in Japan, near where Sam Kusano of Price comes from - Fukuska. The body of the dead man was taken to Salt Lake City for burial there, but according to the Japanese custom the finger nails and hair of the head of the body was sent to his native country on Monday last. The man was very popular with Americans and his countrymen as well. S. Kusano attended the obsequies.

Ambrosia, Giueseppe (Joe)
Report of the Industrial Commission 1925- Claim No. 1177 - Decision rendered July 14, 1925.

Ammirati Ambrosia, widow of Giuseppe (Joe) Ambrosia, deceased, for herself and Angela Ambrosia, minor daughter, by her attorney-in-fact, F. Anselmo, vs Utah Fuel Company.

On March 8th, 1924, Giueseppe (Joe) Ambrosia, while regularly employed by the Utah Fuel Company, was killed by reason of an explosion in Mine No. 2 of said company at Castle Gate, Utah. On said date decedent was earning a wage sufficient in amount to entitle any surviving dependents to the maximum compensation allowed by law. The Utah Fuel Company paid for the burial of decedent according to law.

On the date of his death decedent left surviving him and wholly dependent upon him for their maintenance and support, his wife, the applicant above named, and minor daughter, above named, aged 9 years, both of whom resided at Casino, Catanzaro, Italy. Decedent contributed regularly to their maintenance and support.

Ordered, that compensation be paid to the widow and minor daughter of decedent in the sum of $8.00 per week for a period of 312 weeks.

Ames, Raymond Reuben
Ogden Standard Examiner, Wed. Feb. 6, 1918
DRIVER DIES FROM ACCIDENT SHOCK

SCHOFIELD FEB 5. - Raymond R. Ames, 26 years old, a car driver for the Schofield Coal company, now operating the old Union Pacific mine, died last night as the result of an accident at the mine yesterday.

Ames was riding on the bumper in front of a car and slipped, falling beneath the wheels, which passed over his legs, breaking both. Death resulted rather from the shock of the accident than the actual injuries. His body was sent by freight to his home at Moroni. He leaves a young widow and two small children.

Anderson, Clair C.
Ogden Standard Examiner 1-11-1947
Coal Miner Killed by Derailed Car

PRICE - Clair C. Anderson, 21-year-old Fountain Green, Utah, miner, was killed yesterday in an accident at the Hiawatha mine of the United States Fuel Co.

Anderson, who was working as a track cleaner, was struck by a car when it was derailed.

Investigators said the wheel of the car broke as it was traveling toward the entrance of the mine in a train of empty coal cars.

A brother, Kenneth Anderson, was standing nearby when the victim was struck.

Clair C. Anderson

Fountain Green, Sanpete County - Clair C. Anderson, 21, Fountain Green, died Friday afternoon of injuries suffered in an accident in the Hiawatha mine.

Mr. Anderson was pinned to the side of the mine shaft when a rail car became derailed, falling against him. He died shortly after the accident. He suffered neck and leg fractures.

He was born Nov. 30, 1926, a son of Arthur G. and Theora C. Anderson. He was graduated from Moroni high school, after which he entered the U S Army in August, 1944. Shortly after completing his basic army training he was sent overseas, where he saw action in Germany. He was in the Army for 14 months until he received a medical discharge.

Survivors in addition to his parents include five brothers and sisters, Wendell, Forrest, Merrill, and Dorothy Anderson, Mrs. Mary Peel, all of Fountain Green, his grandmother Mrs. Sarah A. Anderson, Fountain Green.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday at 1:30 pm in the Fountain Green ward chapel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Scott Cook, Bishop.

Extracts from a story "Cherished Memories of Home" by Dorothy Ann Anderson Ostler, page 19. FamilySearch.org: He was sent to Camp Fannin, Texas for his basic training and then he was sent to Germany. He was sent right to the front lines and was in active combat. His company was one of the first to cross the Rhine River. He was there during the winter months and his feet were frozen while fighting from fox holes. I can remember of him telling us that he prayed that if he could get through the war alive and come home and live for one year – he’d be satisfied. Clair was discharged from the army on October 15, 1945.

Dad and the boys planned on farming the land on the divide in the spring, so the boys decided to get a job for the winter months. There were no jobs around Fountain Green and so Wendell, Clair, Forrest and a friend named Darus Anderson, went to Hiawatha, Utah and found a job in the coal mines. They had been working for just a couple of days when Clair was killed in an accident in the mine. What a terrible tragedy for all of us! We were all stunned by it. It’s something you never forget. This happened January 10, 1947 and he was only twenty-one years old. Clair is buried in the Fountain Green Cemetery.

Anderson, Ervin Andrew (Erwin)
News Advocate 11-26-1925
HOLD FUNERAL SERVICES FOR FORMER RAINS MINER

Funeral services were held in the Castle Dale ward chapel Tuesday afternoon for Erwin A. Anderson, 27, who died Thursday at Salt Lake City.

Two years ago Mr. Anderson was severely injured by a piece of falling coal at the Rains mine in Carbon county. He was taken to the Holy Cross hospital, where he remained for several months before returning home, but he never fully recovered. For some time he had resided in Salt Lake City.

Some weeks ago he came to Castle Dale to go on a deer hunt, but soon after his return his condition became serious and he was sent back to the hospital where he died.

Mr. Anderson is survived by his widow, and three children, Chad K., 4, Doline, 2 and Veloy, 2. His aged mother and the following brothers and sisters also survive: Fred James, Parley, Nels, Joseph, Lee, Mrs. Anna Clawson, Emma Adams and Mrs. Deana Vance.

Anderson, George
1914 Biennial Mine Report - page 120

George Anderson, American, age 16, single, employed as switch tender, was instantly killed on the outside switch of eighth raise rope road, Winter Quarters, No. 1 Mine, April 14, 1914. On this date Anderson was employed on the eighth main switch. At noon Sam England as motorman, came from the tenth parting light for the purpose of eating lunch at the main hoist. When the motor came past the eighth raise main switch, Anderson, with another boy, jumped on the motor and rode out to the main hoist. After the motorman had lunched (the boys having eaten their lunch before noon on the eighth switch), the motor started back into the tenth raise, Anderson sitting on the front of the motor with feet on front bumper. Just before eighth switch was reached the motorman slowed up and as he was running slowly along the eighth switch Anderson jumped from the moving motor and in some manner fell in the center of the track. Before the motor could be stopped it ran upon him, crushing all the bones in the lower part of his body and also broke his back.

Anderson, Ivey June
News Advocate 1927-04-29
Last Respects Paid to Mine Accident Victim

Ivey June Anderson, 31, who was injured three weeks ago in a mine accident at the Sweet Coal company's mine up Gordon Creek, died Wednesday in Price. Funeral services will be held next Monday at Cleveland, the arrangements being in charge of J. E. Flynn.

Mr. Anderson was born October 2, 1895 at Cleveland, the son of John and Ellen Quinn Anderson.

Anderson, Joseph George
Report of Industrial Commission
Page 125 - Claim No. 2378 - Decision rendered December 14, 1929

Helen Anderson, widow of Jos. Anderson, vs. Utah States Fuel company

On November 5th, 1929, Jos. Anderson was employed by the Utah Fuel Company as a helmetman and while crawling over some rock while fighting a fire in the mine, he scraped his knee which became infected and as a result he died on November 12th, 1929, while en route to the hospital in Salt Lake City. Compensation was awarded to the widow in the sum of $16.00 per week for 312 weeks.

Anderson, Keith Arthur
Ogden Standard Examiner January 17, 1958
Four Men Entombed in Carbon Mine

Price - Four miners were entombed deep inside the Spring Canyon Coal Co. mine 13 miles northwest of here early today when a "bounce" caused a severe cave-in.

A company official said it was not known if the men were buried by the fall of coal and rock or if they were trapped-possibly safely-behind it. "We're hopeful they are behind it and safe," he said.

The cave-in site is about 5,000 feet from the main mine entrance. It is 2,000 feet down the hillside mine's fourth left lateral where the mine itself dips downward.

Families of the men waited outside the mine entrance for any word on whether the four men were alive. The four have a total of 11 children.

It was believed the cave-in, which accompanied the "bounce" or sudden pressure change inside the mine, occurred between 1 and 1:30 a.m.

The ground shook from the bounce was so severe it loosened the entire top face of coal in the cave-in area and workers were forced to timber their rescue shaft as they tunneled toward the trapped men.

The spokesman said the latest report was that rescue workers had tunneled 800 feet through the giant pile of debris in an effort to reach the miners.

The four trapped men were identified as William Daniels, 47, the mine face boss; his son-in-law, Dean Nielsen, 29, the shuttle car operator; Cecil Garcia, 36, a rope rider, and Keith Anderson, 30, a motorman. Garcia is from Helper. The other three are from Spring Canyon.

A Bulletin attached to the above article:

Price - The body of one of four trapped coal miners was recovered this afternoon. He was Cecilio Garcia, 36, father of four children. There was no word of the other men.

Ogden Standard Examiner, Saturday, Jan. 18, 1958
Third Miner's Body Found; No Hope Held for Fourth

SPRING CANYON - Blackfaced, dirty workers recovered today the body of a third man trapped deep in a coal mine by an earth tremor that caused a cave-in.

A fourth man was still caught somewhere under tons of rock and rescuers held no hope he would be found alive. He is Dean Nielsen, 27.

The body of Keith Anderson, 30, was uncovered this morning. Both he and Nielsen were from Spring Canyon, a tiny company mining town of dreary brown sandstone about 120 miles southeast of Salt Lake City.

Late last night workmen, erecting timbers as they proceeded, against the possibility of further cave-ins, uncovered the body of William Daniels, 47, also of Spring Canyon.

Earlier they found the body of Cecilio Garcia, 36, the father of seven children from nearby Helper. He was not caught beneath the torrent of falling coal set loose when a "bounce" - a shift in the mountain above the mine-sent the rocks crashing down.

Garcia apparently was hit on the head by a flying rock. A doctor said he never knew what hit him.

Rescuers at first hoped for another miracle such as occurred at nearby Sunnyside two years ago when three men survived after being buried in a similar cave-in for 72 hours.

There was no such miracle here. The faces of the workers showed they knew it as they marched wearily away from the mine portal after a shift of rescue work.

Two officials expressed what the miners hadn't the heart to say.

The mine manager, C. E. Pauley, said he didn't see how the men could be found alive. And Clair Nowren, a safety engineer, said it was inconceivable.

The four men were working overtime to remove equipment from one of the shafts that honeycomb a mountain. If they had left at the end of their regular shift, the mine would have been empty.

Salt Lake Tribune, Sunday Morning, January 19, 1958
Death in Spring Canyon

All Utah joins the bereaved families and friends of the four victims of the Spring Canyon coal mine disaster in mourning his tragedy.

While investigation has not been completed, this appears to be the kind of coal mine accident that is practically unavoidable. A "bounce" or earth slip above the tunnel in which the men were working caused a sudden cave-in, filling the tunnel with coal dust. An electric wire short or other spark caused by the cave-in set off an explosion.

The mine had been inspected only about six weeks ago, but a state safety inspector was quoted as saying: "No inspection could foretell this."

Underground mining by the very nature of things is a hazardous occupation. Despite, all the safety precautions in the world, some accidents will happen. Utah actually has had quite a safe record, for this is the worst coal mine disaster in years.

This does not lessen the blow to those bereaved. It is bleak tragedy to four wives suddenly made widows, to 17 children of the four men, and to two children yet unborn. Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to them.

Salt Lake Tribune January 19, 1958
Mine Shaft Gives Up Third Victim's Body

PRICE - The body of the third of four Carbon County miners trapped early Friday in a mine cave-in was brought to the surface at 10:20 a.m. Saturday.

The badly crushed and burned body of Keith Arthur Anderson, 30, was found under tons of rock and coal about 5,000 feet from the shaft entrance in an unused section of the Spring Canyon Coal Co. mine.

Previously recovered were the bodies of Cecilio Garcia, 35, of Helper, brought up at noon Friday, and face boss William Daniels, 47, recovered late Friday evening.

Still missing and presumed dead is Russell Dean Nielsen, 29, son-in-law of Mr. Daniels. From the position of the bodies already recovered, officials believed Mr. Nielsen is buried under eight feet of rock some 80 feet further down the choked shaft.

Rescue work was hampered all day Friday by an explosion and fire following the cave in, which was caused by a "bounce" or shift in the mountain above the mine. All fallen rock must be recovered and removed from the shaft by hand, further slowing efforts to reach Mr. Nielsen.

Keith Arthur Anderson was born at Emery, Emery County, September 6, 1927, the son of Clinton C. and Florence Abelin Anderson. He married Edna Sheets. He had been a resident of Spring Canyon for the past nine years.

Surviving are his parents, Carbonville; widow, three daughters, Susanne, Connie and Dawn, Spring Canyon; two brothers and one sister, Preston C. U. S. Navy, Fallon, Nev.; Maurice, Carbonville; Mrs. Rine Erickson, Spring Canyon.

Funeral will be Tuesday at 1 p.m. in Price Tabernacle, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with burial in Emery Cemetery.

William Daniels was born March 23, 1910, Lafayette, Colo., the son of Charles and Jeannie Daniels. He was married to Elsieanna Mitchell at Grand Junction, Colo. In 1933. He had been a resident of Spring Canyon since 1952.

Surviving are his parents, Oak Creek, Colo.; his widow, three sons and two daughters, Gilbert, Steamboat Springs, Colo; Stanley, U. S. Navy, San Diego, Calif.; Charles Albert, Emily Jane, and Mrs. Dean Nielsen, Spring Canyon; and a brother, Albert, Carlsbad, N.M.

Cecilio Garcia, was born March 29, 1921 in Canyoncito, N. M. son of Fredencio and Garguerita Gurule Garcia. He was married to Solema Garcia in Helper, June 3, 1945.

He is survived by his wife and the following children: Virginia, Linda Sue, Lucy Margie, Mary Jean, Lawrence Cecil and Eddie F. all of Helper; four brothers, Dommitlio, Lee, Ferman and Joe; two sisters, Sophia Chevez and Livie Lucero. The Rosary will be said Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in Mitchell Funeral Home. Requiem Mass will be said Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. in Helper St. Anthony Church.

Daily Herald Jan. 19, 1958
3 Bodies Recovered From Mine - Digging Continued at Spring Canyon for Body of 4th Miner.

PRICE - Rescue workers Saturday uncovered the mangled body of a third miner, one of four trapped Friday thousands of feet inside a mountain coal mine.

Digging continued for the fourth miner under a 2,000 foot long caved in tunnel of the Spring Canyon Coal Co. mine 13 miles northwest of Price. The cave-in was followed by an explosion and fire.

Two bodies were uncovered Friday.

The victim found this morning was Keith Anderson, 30, Spring Canyon.

The find further weakened hopes that the fourth miner, Dean Nielsen, 29, Spring Canyon, would be found alive. Workers said they had found no trace of him by mid-morning

Friday the body of Cecelio Garcia, 36, was found. Late Friday night rescue workers found the body of William Daniels, 47.

Daniels and Garcia, along with Anderson and Nielsen, Daniel's son-in-law, were working overtime removing old tracks and equipment when the tunnel collapsed with an earthquake-like bounce which dumped tons of coal, rock and debris on the men.

Teams of rescue workers reached Garcia's body shortly after noon Friday, 11 hours after the cave-in occurred. He was found in a clear area at the far end of the caved in section.

Officials said his skull had been crushed by falling debris.

The other three miners were trapped beneath the fall itself.

From the start, rescue crews knew there was little chance any of the three could be found alive.

However, the rescuers remember another mine cave-in near here April 18, 1956 at the Sunnyside mine of Kaiser Steel Co. In that cave-in, three of four trapped miners were found "miraculously" alive after nearly 40 hours entombment.

Rescue crews from the Sunnyside mine joined Spring Canyon workers in the rescue effort.

Diggers encountered fires inside the mine Friday but extinguished them.

Anderson, Outney
Newspaper article but no information
BURIED AT FAIRVIEW

The body of Outney Anderson, machine man, who was killed in the mine at Standardville last Thursday afternoon when a runaway trip ran over him, was taken to Fairview Saturday morning for funeral service and interment which occurred Monday. Anderson was born in Iceland in 1882 but had lived in Utah for many years, the past seven years having been spent at Standardville. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Sylvia Anderson, and six children who live at Fairview. In the accident that ended his life the man's body was badly mutilated, the back being broken, the trunk nearly severed in two and the face and head being badly cut and broke.

FAIRVIEW - Mt. Pleasant Pyramid, 1923-06-29

Mr. Outney Anderson of Fairview aged 41 was killed in a mine accident at Standardville June 14. Funeral services were held in the north ward chapel Monday June 18th, counselor E. H. Anderson of the South ward presiding. Music was furnished by choir members of both wards, with special numbers by Mrs. Kimball Mower and Company and a duet by Mrs. Eli A. Day Jr. and Bishop Peter Sundwall. The speakers were S. S. Sanderson and C. L. Pritchett with closing remarks by E. H. Anderson. Floral offerings were profuse. The funeral was very well attended. Mr. Anderson leaves a wife Mrs. Sylvia Hartley Anderson and seven children, Belma, Leah, Verda, Sherman, Bertha, Wilbert and Dean Anderson to mourn his loss.

Mr. Anderson was born in Iceland but came with his parents to Utah when he was eleven years old. They came for the gospel sake. His home was formerly at Spanish Fork but he has worked in the coal mines for twenty years. Has made his home in Fairview for several years past, but has worked at Standardville for seven years. Was known as an excellent workman and respected by all who knew him. He leaves a brother and sister in Spanish Fork and one brother in Iceland.

Anderson, William (W.H.)
Report of Industrial Commission of Utah July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922
Page 931 - FATAL ACCIDENTS - 1921

W. H. Anderson, an American, was killed by being run over by the truck of the mining machine, January 31, 1921. (Machine runner ran over by truck while in the act of moving machine.) Age 26.

Anderson, William
Report of Industrial Commission - Page 56 - 1928

November 5th, 1928, Mutual Coal Company, Rains, Utah. William Anderson, Finlander, age 51, married. Killed by a fall of rock which broke loose to a water slip on the inside row of props and the left rib of pillar. Two additional props should have been set under this rock.

Andrezzi, Ernest
Salt Lake Tribune 12-5-1957
Tons of Rock, Coal Tumbles Kill 3 Miners in Sunnyside
Cave-in Buries Trio Alive In Passageway for Air

Sunnyside - Tons of coal and rock caved in two miles underground in a Sunnyside coal mine Wednesday at 10:08 a.m., crushing to death three miners.

The accident occurred in an air course passageway of Kaiser Steel Coal Mine No. 1. The miners were buried under two feet of coal and rock.

The victims were Earnest Andrezzi, 48, Sunnyside, a mine mason; Ray R. Medina, 25, Price, a mason's helper, and Danny Dragon, 56, Sunnyside, a timber man.

A rescue crew went to work immediately to dig out the miners. Bodies of Mr. Andrezzi and Mr. Medina were recovered about 10:30 a.m. and the body of Mr. Dragon was found three hours later. No one else was injured.

Mine officials said the three men were working in the 18-foot wide passageway which runs parallel to the main slope and carries fresh air into the mine.

Coal from the ribs or sides of the tunnel began to slide, loosening a coal and rocks on the roof which caved in on the workers. The miners either were crushed to death or suffocated before the rescue crew could reach them, mine officials said.

All three bodies were found only a few feet apart in the passageway.

Workers in other parts of the shaft said the cave-in shook the whole mine, although it was described by mine officials as a relatively small cave-in compared with others of the past.

It was not immediately determined exactly what caused the cave-in. An investigation will be conducted by federal and state mine inspectors.

Officials said the mine would begin operating again after a traditional 24-hour layoff following a mine accident.

The accident recalls a similar cave-in April 18, 1956, in the nearby Kaiser Mine No. 2. Three men lay trapped and buried two days and were found alive by rescue workers in one of the most thrilling dramas of Utah mining history.

A fourth miner was killed in the cave-in.

Wednesday's cave-in marked the sixth death this year in Sunnyside mining accidents.

Angelozo, Louis
Salt Lake Tribune, Sun. Dec. 15, 1935
Coal Miner Dies In Work Accident - Companion Escapes When Slide Starts at Standardville.

STANDARDVILLE - Caught under falling coal at the mine of the Standard Coal Company here Wednesday, Louis Angelo, 51, of Helper, received injuries causing his death in the local hospital Saturday at 1:30 a.m.

Angelo received a broken right leg, broken arm and internal injuries. Louis Grecco of Helper, who was working near him at the time of the accident, escape injury.

Angelo was born in Italy in 1886, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Angelo. He has resided at Helper with an aunt, Mary Ambrosio, during the past nine years. He has no other known surviving relatives living in the United States.

Funeral services had not been completed Saturday. The body is at the Flynn funeral home at Price.

Angotti, Antonio (Tony)
Salt Lake Tribune - 17 Oct 1929
CARBON COUNTY WORKMAN DIES IN MINE CRASH

Price - Tony Angotti, 21, died about noon Wednesday at Kenilworth from injuries received in a cave-in in mine No. 2 of Independent Coal & Coke company at Kenilworth, early Wednesday morning. Sam Vecchio, 26, was working with Angotti and received a fractured pelvis bone. According to Dr. J. W. Robinson, Vecchio is in a serious condition, but will probably recover. Cause of death was given as acute traumatic shock and severely crushed chest with a fractured humerus as contributory."

Angotti was working as an electric shovel worker and had loaded about 8 cars of coal when the roof of the room in which he was working caved in.

Deceased is survived by his widow, Mary Mackay Angotti, whom he married but a few months ago: his mother and several brothers and sisters. The body is at the J. E. Flynn funeral parlors, in Price.

published in The Salt Lake Tribune Oct 17, 1929
CARBON COUNTY WORKMAN DIES IN MINE CRASH

Sprecial to The Tribune

PRICE- Tony Angotti, 21 died about noon Wednesday at Kenilworth from injuries received in a cave-in in mine No.2 of the Independent Coal & Coke company at Kenilworth, early Wednesday morning. Sam Vecchio, 26, was working with Angotti and received a fractured pelvis bone. According to Dr. J.W. Robinson, Vecchio is in a serious condition, but will probably recover. Cause of death was given as "acute traumatic shock and severly crushed chest with a fractured humerus as contributory."

Angotti was working as an elctric shovel worker and had loaded about 3 cars of coal when the roof of the room in which he was working caved in.

Deceased is survived by his widow, Mary Mackay Angotti, whom he married but a few months ago; his mother and several brothers and sisters. The body is at the J.E. Flynn funeral parlors, in Price.

Angotti, Giuseppi (Joe)
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1913-1914 - page 20

Joe Angotti, Italian miner, 23 years of age, single, was killed in the 2nd Left chain pillar, about room 15, March 15th, 1913.

Angotti with two partners, was drawing pillars in the 2nd Left entry, and had finished timbering up their place when a small bounce occurred, dislodging a piece of rock from between the timbers. This rock fell end wise, striking Angotti on the head, crushing his skull and killing him instantly.

Angus, Joseph Raymond (Ray)
Sun Advocate - January 19, 1961
First Mine Death of New Year Listed Yesterday

Ray Angus, 59 year old Helper coal miner, was killed yesterday at about 2:30 p.m. just before the end of the day's shift, when he was struck by a large piece of slate which fell from the ceiling of the Carbon Fuel Company mine about three miles west of Helper. He was a shovel operator.

This is the first fatality in Carbon mines in 1961.

He was born August 21, 1901, at Jensen, the son of John A. and Bertha B. Dennis Angus. He had been a coal miner for 40 years, all of that time in the mines of Carbon county.

Surviving are his widow, Helper; five daughters and two sons; Mrs. J. L. (Smiles) Oveson, Elmo; Charles Ray Angus, with the U. S. Army in Germany; Mrs. W. B. (Mickey) Pitts, Temple, Texas; Jerry B. Angus, with the U. S. Air Force in Denver; Mrs. Jack (Lois) McCormick, Grants, New Mexico, and Betty Angus, Helper. Also surviving are 25 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; his mother at Ioka, Duchesne county; four sisters.

Funeral arrangements will be announced by the Mitchell Funeral Home.

Salt Lake Tribune Thu. Jan. 19, 1961
Slate Roofing Collapses, Kills Miner

Martin, Carbon County - A 59 year old Helper coal miner was killed Wednesday when he was crushed beneath a falling piece of slate roofing at the Carbon Fuel Co. coal mine here.

The victim was Ray Angus.

Mine officials said he was operating a shovel loading coal at the face of the mine when the slate broke away from the roof supporting pin and fell on him.

The accident happened about 2:30 p.m. A group of workers lifted the slate slab off Mr. Angus.

Anton, Nick
Industrial Commission of State of Utah, Claim No. 384

Pursuant to notice and order of the Industrial Commission of Utah, this cause came on regularly to be heard on the eighth day of February, 1921, before The Industrial commission of Utah, at ten o'clock a.m. in room 410 State Capital, Salt Lake City, Utah.

On the twelfth day of January, 1921, the State Insurance Fund applied to the commission to have it determined as to whether or not Nick Anton, also known as Nikaloas Antoniou, eft any person or persons either totally or partially dependent upon him at the time of his death February 24, 1918, as result of injuries received on the twenty-second day of February, 1918. At the hearing held on the eighth day of February, it appeared that there might be dependents in this case.

That on the twenty-second day of February, 1918, Nick Anton, also known as Nikaloas Antoniou, of Castle Gate, Utah, and a citizen of Greece, was injured by accident. He was employed at a coal mine of the Utah Fuel Company at Castle Gate as a car dropper and on said date he was dropping a loaded car to the lower scales when a pin came out of the brake hanger allowing the brake beam to drop down and the brake shoe caught in a frog which is about one hundred feet below the scales, and caused a brake club, which was in the wheel of the brake staff, to turn quickly and strike him in the side. As result of said accident Nick Anton sustained contusion of abdomen and lower part of chest on left side, some internal injury, probably to the kidney, spleen or both, and died as result of said injuries on the twenty-fourth day of February, 1918.

That the deposition shows that the father, Demetrios Antoniou, at the time of the death of Nick Anton, was partially dependent upon the decedent for his maintenance and support, showing a number of minor brothers and sisters of decedent who participated in the contributions made by the deceased. Unfortunately, the employer, the Utah Fuel Company, desires to take advantage of the Statute of Limitations as a bar to this claim.

In view of the foregoing findings the Commission is obliged to conclude that on the twenty-second day of February, 1918, Nick Anton was accidentally injured by reason of an accident arising out of and in the course of his employment; that on the twenty-fourth day of February, 1918, he died as result of said injuries; that the father of the decedent established to the satisfaction of the Commission that he, together with the minor brother and sisters, were partially dependent upon the decedent for their maintenance and support, but in view, a self-insurer, has taken advantage of the statute of limitations, the Commission is obliged to law to deny compensation.

Wherefore, it is Ordered that the claims of the State Insurance Fund and of Demetrios Antoniou be, and the same are hereby denied.

Research note: Age 33 died Feb. 24, 1918

Aplanalp (Abplanalp), William Lynn
News Advocate
Fall of Coal injures two

Two machine men employed at the Blue Blaze Coal mine in Consumers were injured Tuesday when they were struck by falling rock from the roof of the mine. The injured were William Aplanalp who was taken to the Holy Cross hospital in Salt Lake Wednesday with a broken back and William Reaveley who sustained a fractured jaw and a fracture in one of the bones of his skull. He is at the Consumers hospital.

The accident occurred when the pressure from the machine which was jacked against the rock caused a cave in. Reaveley was able to walk out of the mine.

Apostolakis, John
Report of Industrial Commission of Utah July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922 - Page 926/927 - FATAL ACCIDENTS

John Apostalakis, a Greek, 28 years old and single, was killed August 14, 1920, No. 1 Hiawatha Mine, by a fall of top coal in gob. While he was sawing a prop to replace another one which had been broken, the lip of the top coal suddenly broke off close to the end of the cap pieces that were set on three props which were set under the top coal and fell, instantly killing Apostalakis and seriously injuring Mike Stamblakis, who was standing on the right side of the car speaking to John Apostalakis.

Death Certificate

Male, Greek, single, coal miner, birth date unknown. Accidental instantaneous fracture last cervical and first dorsal vert. Fracture of sacrum at right sacroiliac synchondrosis. Removal to Price, Utah. Price City Cemetery - 1 - F-012-01

Research information - John Apostolakis, age 28, single, appears in the Hiawatha 1920 U. S. Census. Living as a boarder with 12 other men in the home of John Dallas. John Dallas also has a nephew, age 6, named Michael Stamatakis, living with him.

Aramaki, Matakumi (Matakuma)
Funeral Services Set For Accident Victim - Salt Lake Telegram 1936-04-07

Price - Funeral services for Matakuma Aramaki, 46, Hiawatha coal miner, will be conducted in the Flynn funeral chapel Friday at 1 p.m.

Mr. Aramaki was killed Saturday in a mine accident at Hiawatha. He had been a resident of Hiawatha six years. He has no known survivors in the United States.

Salt Lake Tribune - April 5, 1936 page 9
Rock Falls Kills Japanese Miner - Helper Escapes as Roof of Room in Coal Mine Tumbles

PRICE-A fall of rock from the ceiling of the room he had entered a few minutes before to begin his day's work, crushed to death Matakuma Aramaki, 49, Japanese coal miner, Saturday morning at the U.S. Fuel company mine at Hiawatha.

Aramaki, with Tom Ishikawa, his partner, examined the roof of the room upon entering and adjudged it to be safe, C. N. Orr, mine superintendent, reported following an investigation. The accident occurred 30 minutes later. Ishikawa escaped being struck.

Aramaki had been employed at the Hiawatha mine for six years and was employed by the company for 18 years. Company records show his mother, Mrs. Omaha Aramaki, resided in Japan in 1930. He has no other known survivors.

At the time of his death, Aramaki was a member of the United Mine Workers of America. The body is at the Flynn mortuary in Price pending funeral arrangements.

Archuleta, Cristobal
Salt Lake Tribune - Friday, May 25, 1945
RUNAWAY CAR KILLS MINER

DRAGERTON - A runaway mine car at the Geneva Steel Co. mine in Horse canyon ran over Cristobal Archuleta, 23, Dragerton, Thursday at 3 p.m., severing his body.

Mr. Archuleta was moving a lump of coal from the track at the time of the accident and evidently did not see the runaway car. He had been employed in the Horse canyon mine as a loader-headman the past six years.

He was born at Coyote, N. M., April 13, 1922.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Rodriguez Archuleta, and daughter, Mary Alice Archuleta, Dragerton, with other immediate relatives living at Durango, Colo.

Mitchell funeral home, Price, will announce funeral arrangements.

Ardohain, Mike
Salt Lake Tribune Dec. 18, 1963
Funeral Services set for 9 miners

Martin, Carbon County -- Funeral arrangements for nine men killed in the mine blast here were completed Tuesday.

The blast occurred Monday at Carbon Fuel Co.'s No. 2 mine west of here.

Names of the victims and time and place of their funerals follows:

(NOTE: Obituary is listed under each specific miner's name)

Mike Ardohain, 38, Price, was born July 14, 1925, at Basque Pieroness, France. He married Melba Flematakis, Jan. 18, 1957, at Price. Survivors include his widow, Price, parents, France, brothers, and sisters, Miguel, Nevada; Jean Pierre, Martin, and Mrs. Catherine Etechaveria, all of France.

Requiem Mass will be celebrated Friday at 9:30 a.m. at the Price Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church. Holy Rosary will be recited at the Mitchell Funeral Home Chapel Thursday at 7 p.m. Burial will follow at the Price Cemetery.

Argyle, Mark Woodyett
Salt Lake Telegram Nov. 24, 1926
Miner is Electrocuted In Mutual Co.'s Tunnel -- Mark Argyle Hits High Tension Wire Just as He Quits Work for Day

RAINS Nov 24 - Three weeks after he had obtained employment here in the Mutual Coal Company's mine, Mark Argyle, 30, was electrocuted as he came off shift Tuesday night. He was the son of the late Benjamin and Jane Robertson Argyle.

According to reports by mine officials, Argyle met his tragic death when he came in contact with a high tension electric wire as he emerged from the workings of the mine.

Mr. Argyle was born at Spanish Fork, March 17, 1896, and had been in this mining camp only three weeks. In addition to his mother, he is survived by a brother, Shirley Argyle of Bingham, Utah; and a sister, Aston Argyle, a teacher at the Jordan high school.

The body was taken to the Flynn mortuary in Spanish Fork. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Arnold, Lawrence
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1915-1916 - page 24

Lawrence Arnold, American, age 19, single, employed as motorman's helper, was injured March 1, 1915, in the third right entry of mine No. 1 at Storrs, Utah, from the effects of which he died the following day.

Arnold, as was customary, was riding the first car coming out of the entry. Against the rules of the company a machine-man had connected a bare wire on to the trolley wire for a cutting-machine, and was operating in No. 6 room. This power wire sagged somewhat from the roof and Arnold, not knowing that the wire had been connected with the trolley wire, thought of no danger from that source, and while standing on the car his face, near the temple, came in contact with the sagging wire and he was shocked sufficiently by the contact to knock him from the car in front of a moving trip, where he suffered a laceration in the back of the head, fracture of right leg and compound fracture of right arm.

Arvanitakis (Arvanctakis), Deonsios
Report of Industrial Commission of Utah July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922 -Page 932 - FATAL ACCIDENTS - 1921

Deonsios Arvanctakis, a Greek, 35 years old and married, was killed by having his head crushed between platform of box car loader and jam of box car, accident at No. 1 tipple August 29, 1921.

Asay, Charles
Salt Lake Telegram 1945-04-25
Hiawatha Miner Dies in Mishap

Hiawatha, Carbon County - A fall of coal from the roof of the Hiawatha mine of the United States Fuel Co., took the life of Charles Asay, 65, Hiawatha, Tuesday at about 8:40 p.m.

Mr. Asay was regularly employed as a trimmer, but at the time of the accident, he was working on a joy loader, a machine which loads the coal from the floor into the mine cars. The fall of coal was not very large, but fell directly on the man, badly crushing his body and killing him instantly, according to mine officials. No other members of the crew were injured.

The victim entered the employ of the company in 1919 and had worked regularly since that time. A report from the mine office stated that his working record was very good and that he was seldom absent from the job.

He was born at Mount Carmel, Kane County, June 5, 1879

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Ada Asay; one daughter, Mrs. Virginia Gunderson, North Carolina; three sons, James Asay, Hiawatha; Lyle Asay, Washington, D.C., and Carlos Asay, serving in the armed forces.

Funeral services will be announced from the Mitchell funeral home in Price.

Askern, Carroll John
Daily Herald, Fri. Jan 30, 1959
Price Man Killed In Mine Accident

SUNNYSIDE - The second fatal mine accident in Carbon County this year Thursday claimed the life of C. John Askern, 43, Price.

Askern was killed in the Kaiser Steel Co. coal mine in Sunnyside when about eight feet of coal crushed down on him following an underground "bounce."

Another worker, Lavell T. Widdison, Dragerton, was near Askern when the accident occurred. He was buried up to his knees, by the cave-in but managed to dig himself out and escape serious injury.

Salt Lake Tribune Sat. Jan. 31, 1959

PRICE - Funeral for Carrol John Askern, 43, killed in a mine accident Thursday at Sunnyside, will be Saturday, 4 p.m. at Mitchell Funeral Chapel, Price. Burial Price City Cemetery. Born June 29, 1915. Confidence, Iowa, to Mr. and Mrs. Louis Askern. Married Eva Seeronem, 1943, Salt Lake City, World War II veteran, member Sunnyside Local United Mine Workers of America. Survivors: widow; daughter, Shawna, Price; sister, Mrs. Roy Phillips, Numa, Iowa; father, Oakland, Calif.

Averett, William Arthur (Everett)
Mt. Pleasant Pyramid, 9 Sept 1925
Arthur Averett Killed in Coal Mine by Falling Rock

Arthur Averett of Mt. Pleasant was killed Wednesday in a cave-in in the Wattis Mine at Wattis, Utah, according to advices just received by his family. The exact details of the accident are not yet known but the body is at an undertaking establishment at Price and will be brought to Mt. Pleasant for funeral and interment.

Mr. Averett was born in Mt. Pleasant, July 30, 1875 of pioneer parents, William and Annie Coates Averett. He is survived by his wife Mrs. Louisa Phipps Averett whom he married November 1, 1893, and by the following sons and daughters, Mrs. Eva Royce, Mrs. Curtiss, Thomas, Wilburn, Lettie and Dale Averett, all of Mt. Pleasant. He is also survived by his aged father, William Averett, Sr. of Springville and by one brother, Joseph Averett of Salt Lake, and four sisters, Mrs. Susie Oldham of California, Mrs. Myrtle Sale of Casper, Wyoming, Mrs. Mabel Wilson of Mackay, Idaho, and Mrs. Alice McDonald of Pocatello, Idaho.

Funeral services were held here in the Mt. Pleasant North ward chapel this Saturday afternoon for Arthur Averett with Bishop H.C. Jacobs in charge. The combined North and South ward choirs sang "Rock of Ages," and "I Need Thee Every Hour" and "Sometime We'll Understand." Miss Christie Clark sang, "I've Done My Work." the speakers were Christian Johansen, Henry P. Olsen and Bishop H.C. Jacobs. Prayers were offered by A.H. Anderson and William Olson. The grave in the city cemetery was dedicated by Bishop A.L. Peterson. the local Woodman Lodge performed their ritualistic service at the graveside with I.E. Jorgensen in charge. A ladies quartette consisting of Mr. Lydia Hansen, Mr. Josephenie Candland, Mrs. Hettie Olsen and Mrs. Lydia Rackman sang "Nearer My God to Thee."

Azbe, John
1914 Biennial Mine Report - page 120

John Azbe, Austrian, single, age 35, employed as timber man, was killed on motor parting, Sunnyside No. 1 Mine, April 23, 1914. Azbe, with two other men was re-timbering and widening the outside motor parting on the Fowler entry. Some new crossbars had been set and the old ones were being removed on the night of the accident. While chopping the leg of the old cross bar in two, the weight of the rock broke the cross bar and Azbe was buried beneath the rock and timber. When removed he was found to be dead.

B

Babcock, Benjamin Franklin
Eastern Utah Advocate 22 May 1902

Scofield Miner taken to St. Marks Hospital, B. F. Babcock, a miner employed in No. 5 Mine at Scofield was taken to St. Marks Hospital at Salt Lake City last Friday suffering from injuries sustained by two empty cars running away from the dump and back to the tunnel. Babcock is suffering from a broken leg, cut head, and a number of bruises caused by the first car running over him. His home is at Spring Glen, a few miles above Price, and he is well known here abouts, Dr. Isgreen accompanied him to the hospital

Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1901-1902

May 14, 1902 - On this date Benj. F. Babcock, a pump man, was injured in Winter Quarters Mine No. 5 by being struck by a runaway trip. Receiving a compound fracture of left leg and internal injuries, from which he died at St. Mark's hospital, Salt Lake, on May 16th.

Babionitachis (Babionitackis), Mike
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1918-1920 - page 280

Mike Babionitackis, a Greek, 50 years old and single, was fatally injured September 11, 1919, and died September 18, 1919 Standard Mine. He lit a shot which missed fire. He then went back and took out some of the tamping but did not pull out the powder, then he reloaded the hole with new powder and tamped it. After the shot went off he went back to see what it had done. When about 5 minutes later the powder that he put in the hole in the first place went off. He was injured and burned so severely that he died from the effects of the explosion.

Bacco, Albert D.
Salt Lake Tribune, March 16, 1949
Coal Cars Kill Utah Miner on Carbon County Slope

Royal, Carbon County, March 15. Apparently caught at the bottom of a mine slope and crushed by a string of mine coal cars, Albert Bacco, 54, miner for the Spring Canyon Coal Co., was killed here Monday about midnight.

S. A. Dobs, coal mine inspector, who investigated the accident, said Mr. Bacco was working alone in a section of the mine and that because of this there were no witnesses who could shed light on the case. Mr. Bacco's body was found beneath a mine car shortly before midnight by other workers in the mine.

The victim was employed as a rope rider in the mine, and may have slipped or fallen under the car, the inspector said. There were indications that his body was dragged for some distance.

Mr. Bacco was born April 4, 1894, and came here from Colorado about four years ago. He was not married. Attempts were being made Tuesday night to contact relatives, believed living near Oak Creek, Colo.

The body is at the Mitchell funeral home, Price, pending funeral arrangements.

Backlund, Matts Leander Nygard
News Advocate July 20, 1922
Lee Backlund Passes Away; ill a long time.

Lee Backlund, a former resident of Price, died at Kenilworth last Thursday from chronic nephritis and the funeral services were held in this city on Sunday.

Mr. Buckland was born in Finland fifty years ago but had lived in this country many years. The family moved to Kenilworth from Price three years ago but the father has been unable to work much, having been a sufferer during the greater part of the time. He leaves a widow and five children, Clarence, Gladys, Leland, Ruby Louise, and Ruth Adeline.

Clarence has a good position with the Independent Coal and Coke Company and the family will continue to reside in that camp.

Utah Industrial Commission - Claim No. 871 - Decision Rendered January 10, 1924

Selma Backlund, widow of Lee Backlund, deceased, applicant, vs. Independent Coal & Coke Company, defendant.

Alleged that on November 4, 1919, Lee Backlund, while employed by defendant company, was injured by accident, that on said date some coal fell from the roof of the mine in which said employee was working, striking him on the head; that employee returned to work on June 15, 1920, and worked until January 29, 1922, at which time he became incapacitated and died July 13, 1922; that employee was unable to resume his regular former employment after his injury of Nov. 4, 1919.

From evidence submitted the Commission found that Lee Backlund, on November 4, 1919, sustained an injury while regularly employed by the defendant company; that he never fully recovered from said injury; that he suffered pain continuously from the date of injury to the date of his death, July 13, 1922.

Compensation ordered paid to applicant and her minor children; defendant ordered to pay $150.00 funeral expenses; and $135.00 attorney fees to Judge P. C. Evans.

Research notes: born 13 August 1871 in Ahatva, Vaasa, Finland. Died 13 July 1922 in Kenilworth.

Baderitakis, George
News Advocate 1927-12-09
Castle Gate Miner Crushed to Death By slide of Coal

George Baderitakis, 32 year old Castle Gate miner was crushed to death beneath the weight of several tons of coal which dropped on him from an overhanging slope in the No. 2 mine of the Utah Fuel company Saturday. He was dead when found beneath the coal slide.

George Baderitakis was born in Crete, Greece, January 10, 1895. He has been in employ of the Utah Fuel company most of the time in his adopted country. He was well known throughout the county among his countrymen.

He is survived by a widowed mother and five sisters in Greece. He is understood to have several relatives in Salt Lake.

Funeral services were held Tuesday at the Greek Orthodox Church in Price. Many friends from all parts of Carbon County attended despite the fact that the day was extremely cold. Interment was in the Price City cemetery.

Bailey, Glen Carlton
Ogden Standard Examiner, Friday, Oct. 30, 1931
ROCK CRUSHES UTAH WORKMAN

PRICE, Oct. 30 - Glen Bailey, employed in the Sweet mine, 15 miles west of here, was killed Thursday when several tons of coal and rock fell on him.

Bailey was working alone when the cave-in buried him. Workmen labored an hour to recover the body.

Bailey, Wesley Parker
Deseret News & Telegram, July 19, 1957
Funeral Services Set for Utah Mine Victim

CASTLE GATE, Carbon County. Funeral services will be held Sunday for Ilo Edwin Brady, 41 of Ephraim, Sanpete County, one of three Utahns killed in a mine mishap here Thursday.

Services are pending for the other two victims, Harold Lee Wilstead, 31, of Castle Gate, and Wesley Bailey, 41, of Wales, Sanpete county.

The miners were killed Thursday morning when deadly gases escaped from old tunnels of the Independent Coal and Coke Co. mine in Castle Gate.

The men died despite efforts of would be rescuers who reached the victims shortly after the accident occurred about 8:35 a.m.

Mr. Wilstead succeeded in rescuing a fourth miner before he died himself.

The three men were working in the No. 2 mine when a bounce or shifting of the earth, described by a veteran miner as "of very unusual magnitude," struck the mine.

So severe was the upheaval created by the bounce that air seals on old worked-out mine entries were exploded. The monoxide gas poured out through the damaged seals, and the three men perished before they could be brought to safety.

Wilstead helped pull another worker, Mike Milovich of Helper, to safety, but as soon as the pair reached fresh air, Wilstead collapsed. Milovich recovered from the ordeal.

The bounce occurred about 8:25 a.m., with a more severe bounce following about 15 seconds later, miners said.

Felt Above Ground

Residents of Spring Glen, Carbon County, about seven miles from the mine reported they felt the bounce that erupted in the mine.

An entire section of cliffs was pried loose near a mountain located behind the mine entry. Thousands of tons of rock and trees were sent cascading into a huge canyon below.

Artificial respiration was given all the miners until Dr. O. W. Phelps, Helper physician, pronounced them dead.

The men were brought out of the mine shortly before noon.

Fairview Native

Ilo Edwin Brady was born Dec. 12, 1898, at Fairview, Sanpete County, a son of Heber and Jenny Landgreen Brady. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Following the death of his first wife, Mr. Brady was married to Edith Olson of Ephraim in December 1951. He is survived by his widow, two sons and two daughters, Robert C. Brady and Mrs. Eileen Della Corte, Sunnyside, Carbon County, Mrs. LuJean Basso, Royal, Carbon County, and Grant Brady, Castle Gate. Also surviving is a brother, Reid Brady, Sunnyside.

Mr. Brady had worked in the mine for 27 years.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Castle Gate Ward, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Friends may call at the Grant Brady home Sunday from 10 a.m. to time of services. Burial will be in Price City Cemetery.

Ex-Navy Man

Harold Lee Wilstead was born at Lawrence, Emery County, July 26, 1925, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Wilstead. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and had served during World War II with the U.S. Navy.

A former employe at the mine, he had returned to work only one week previous to the recent miner's vacation, and had worked only two days before the fatal accident Thursday.

He is survived by his widow the former June Anderson, to whom he was married Nov., 1947, and two daughters, Linda Lee, 8 and Connie, 3, all of Castle Gate.

Wesley Parkes Bailey was born May 26, 1916, in Moroni, Sanpete County a son of Parley and Dorothea Christensen Bailey.

A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he served for a number of years in the Sunday School Superintendent of Wales Ward. He was also chairman of the ward genealogical committee.

Mr. Bailey was married June 2, 1943, at Wales to Vivian Maria Lamb. She survives as do seven sons, Arthur L., David L, Vern L., Danny Michael, Joe and Max Bailey, all of Wales.

Also surviving are two brothers, Max and Jack Bailey of Moroni, and six sisters, Mrs. Elda Maxfield, Bountiful; Mrs. Ilene Petersen, Mt. Pleasant; Mrs. Beth Christensen, St. George; Mrs. Fay Busenbark, San Francisco, and Mrs. Afton Rasmussen and Mrs. Ruth Syme, Provo.

Baird, Dave Pershing
Ogden Standard Examiner, May 5, 1960
3 Lose Lives in Utah Accidents, Drowning

Utah counted three more persons dead today as the result of a mining mishap, a drowning and an auto-pedestrian accident.

Dave P. Baird, 41, of Price, died last night of injuries he received Jan. 29 in a Carbon County mining accident.

Felix Francis Clark, 58, was drowned in an irrigation ditch near his home at the King Ranch in Oakley.

Melvin Ernest Mikesell, 50, of Salt Lake City was killed instantly when a car struck him at a crosswalk in Salt Lake City.

Mr. Baird was injured at the Kaiser No. 2 mine at Sunnyside. He was putting up an arch in the mine when a piece of rock fell from the archway, knocking him against a piece of mining equipment. He suffered fatal head injuries.

Salt Lake Tribune Friday May 6, 1960

Dave Pershing Baird - PRICE - Dave Pershing Baird, Price, died Wednesday, 11 p.m. of injuries suffered Jan. 29 at Sunnyside. Born July 25, 1918, Standardville, Carbon County to Robert and Fannie Farish Baird. Married Norma Tucker, Dec. 20, 1944, Latuda, Carbon County. Veteran World War II. Member Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Survivors: widow, daughters, Sandra, Frances, Mary Ann, Price; parents, Carbonville, Carbon County; brothers, sisters, William, Standardville; James, Robert, Mrs. Grant (Elizabeth) Demorest, Salt Lake City; Mrs. John *Margaret) Besso, Price. Funeral Saturday 4 p.m. Price, Thirty-Sixth LDS Ward Chapel. Friends call Mitchell Funeral Home. Friday evening Saturday at place of service. Military rites. Price City Cemetery by American Legion Post 3.

Baldini, Sam (Baldini, Saverio Fu Luigi, Sam)
News Advocate July 8, 1927
SAM ALDINI DIES OF ACCIDENT INJURIES

Sam Baldini, 50 years of age, who died at Spring Canyon last week from pneumonia following a mine accident, was buried in Price City cemetery Sunday. Arrangements were in charge of J. E. Flynn.

The accident victim was the son of Louie and Mary Bisgi Baldini. Practically all his relatives, including his own family, live in Italy.

Report of Industrial Commission 1929 - Claim 2026 Decision rendered July 1st, 1929

Mrs. Marianna Adele Guastalli, widow of Sam Baldini, on behalf of herself and two minor children, vs. Spring Canyon Coal Company.

On June 25th, 1927, Sam Baldini was mining coal underground and was caught under a fall of top coal and his injuries caused death on June 29th, 1927. It was alleged that Sam Baldini left a wife and children dependent upon him. The case came before the Commission several times for Hearing and from the testimony taken in all the proceedings, the Commission concluded that Mrs. Guastalli had not been able to show that she was the legal wife of deceased; also that the two children named had both reached their majority and could not be deemed dependents. Compensation to applicant was denied and the defendant company was ordered to pay the sum of $996.57 into the Employes Combined Injury Benefit Fund.

Salt Lake Telegram July 1, 1929
Three Lose Claim For Compensation

As a climax to a series of postponed hearings that culminated in a meeting before the Industrial commission April 16, 1929, Mrs. Marla Adele Guastalli, together with Emilio and Assunta Baldini Fu Saverio, were denied compensation for the death of Sam Baldini Saverio Fu Luigi, it was announced Monday. Sam Baldini, as he was commonly known, died June 29, 1927, from injuries suffered while employed by the Spring Canyon Coal company when he was caught beneath a cave-in in a mine.

The claim was denied on grounds that the applicant, Marianna Adele Guastalli, had failed to prove that she was the lawful wife of the deceased, and that Emilio and Assunta Baldini Fu Saverlo were not dependent upon the deceased.

Barbieux, Emil Henry
Utah Industrial Commission, Claim No. 3466, Decision rendered May 23, 1935
Berneice Barbieux, widow of Emil H. Barbieux, deceased, on behalf of herself and two minor children, vs. HardscraBle Coal Co. and/or the State Insurance Fund.

On October 13, 1934, Emil H. Barbieux was employed as a miner. He was drilling for brushing when the crank slipped and hit him on the right testicle. He was disabled following the injury. Medical and hospital care and operation were necessary. On October 24, 1934, death resulted from Embryonal Carcinoma of testes with general metastasis. Medical opinions and post-mortem finds expressed the opinion that the injury was the cause of the ailment which caused decedent's death.

Deceased left surviving him, his widow and two minor children, who were dependent upon him. Compensation at the rate of $13.73 per week for 310 3/7 weeks together with statutory burial expense ordered paid.

Barney, Angus M.
Newspaper article:

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon February 8, in the L.D.S. chapel at Price, Utah, for Angus Barney, a victim of the mine disaster which occurred at Standardville, near Price, Thursday night of last week, in which twenty-three men lost their lives.

Mr. Barney was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Barney of Escalante, having resided there until about four years ago when he moved to the Price district where he lived until the time of his death. He was about thirty years of age. He is survived by his widow and four small children.

Baumann, David
Ogden Standard - Examiner, Wed. Oct. 24, 1928
MEETS DEATH IN MINE ACCIDENT

PRICE - Oct. 24 - David Baumann, 51, was killed in a coal burst at the Spring Canyon Coal Company Tuesday afternoon. His skull was fractured and his neck broken. Efforts are being made to locate relatives.

Beck, Levi

Levi Beck was born on November 2, 1892 in Spanish Fork, Utah. He married Iva Pearl Huff on August 16, 1917 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had two children, Allen Levi Beck and Dora Mae Beck born to them before he was killed in the Castle Gate Mine Explosion on March 8, 1924. He is buried in the Spanish Fork Cemetery in Spanish Fork, Utah.

Behunin, Cecil Henry
Tribune Intermountain Wire
Mine Accident Proves Fatal To Carbon Man

HIAWATHA - Cecil Behunin, 38, an employe at the U. S. Fuel company coal mine at Hiawatha, died Wednesday at 3:05 p.m. in a Salt Lake hospital of injuries suffered in a mine accident Saturday afternoon.

Fractured ribs and pneumonia were given as the immediate causes of death.

Mr. Behunin was assisting in moving a cutting machine from one part of the mine to another at the time of the accident. A cutter bar on the machine swung around and knocked a car from the tracks. Mr. Behunin was pinned against the wall by the car, said G. M. Sherfick, mine foreman.

Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Ida Wilde Behunin; a son, Cecil Dale Behunin; and two daughters, Mary Lou and Ida May Behunin, all of Hiawatha; his mother of Ferron; two brothers, Leland Behunin of Ferron, and Oral Behunin of Kellogg, Idaho, and 10 sisters, Mrs. Ida Seely of Reno, Nev.; Mrs. Vera Hansen of Tooele; Mrs. Melvin Byran, Mrs. Ruby Ostler and Miss Dorothy Behunin, all of Ferron; Mrs. Nedra Edmonds of Great Falls, Mont.; Mrs. Roxella Gordon and Mrs. Florence Pettey, both of Hiawatha, and Mrs. Elmer Moody and Mrs. Violet Smith, both of Oakland, Cal.

Bemis, Odes David
Sunday Herald (Provo), Sun. Jan. 31, 1943
Mine Accidents Kill 2 Workers

PRICE - Jan. 30 - An employe of the Independent Coal and Coke Company, Otis D. Bemis, 39, was injured fatally last night when caught under falling top coal, while at work in a Kenilworth mine in Carbon County.

Salt Lake Tribune, Tue. Feb. 2, 1943

Odes David Bemis - PRICE - Funeral services for Odes David Bemis, 39, who was killed in a mine accident at the Independent Coal and Coke company mine at Kenilworth Friday will be conducted in the Mitchell funeral home in Price, Wednesday at 2 p.m.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Ethel May Bemis, a son and daughter by a previous marriage, Hal Bemis and Mrs. Unis Bell of Salt Lake City; his mother who resides in Spokane, Wash.; and seven stepchildren, Miss Violet Brundage, Mrs. Margaret Jackson, and Mrs. Juanita Smith of Price; Mrs. Dorothy Robinson of Redding, Cal.; Mrs. Ona Sexton of Provo; Narvel Brundage of Duchesne and Jack Brundage with the army in Denver, Colo.; two brothers, Harry Bemis of Tulsa, Okla., and Otto Bemis of Seattle, Wash., two sisters, Mrs. Pearl Boyles of Seattle, Wash., and Mrs. Lulla Carleston of Los Angeles, Ca.

Benda, Antone
Article

November 14th, 1906. On this date, Antone Bende, age 39, a miner, was fatally injured in the Castle Gate Mine. Antone Bende was married and had been in the employ of the company three years. Injuries - Skull fractured right temple, scalp wound on top of head about five inches long, also various bruises on body and limbs.

Room had been driven up to limit and cross cutted through to next room, and were on their second skip, being about half way over when accident occurred. The place was examined on the morning of the accident and reported safe by the Fire Boss. The Mine Foreman was in this place the morning previous and found the place well timbered and safe. The driver, who was his partner and had been called out to drive, had brought 2 cars into the room about 1:10 p.m. o'clock, and Bende and his other partner immediately started to load, being between cars and face after about five minutes loading Bende called to his partner, "Look out it (meaning the roof) is coming" his partner ran out at once and got away about 100 feet when the roof caved. Bende must have paused to listen as he was found only 10 feet from where he was loading.

Copy of Inquest - An inquest having been held this day of November 14th, 1906, on the body of Antonio Bende before Justice of the Peace Frank G. Stafford of Castle gate Precinct of the aforesaid county. We the Jurors find after making diligent inquires and having all testimony that the said Antonio Bende came to his death by a sudden cave in of rock and coal.

We the Jurors with the evidence and testimony before us return a verdict of accidental death.

Benedetti (Benedetta), James
Biennial report of the State Mine Inspector 1905-1906

James Benedetta, a miner, age 36, was killed in the Sunnyside Mine number 1 on April 25th, 1905. A piece of rock averaging from two to three inches in thickness and nearly five feet long, about three feet wide fell from roof of his working place striking him on the back, forcing him down against the pick handle with which he was working. Ribs broken and pushed into his lungs causing death a few hours afterwards.

Benedict, Jerry Bart
Ogden Standard Examiner - Wed. Dec. 29, 1943
Coal Miner Killed

HIAWATHA, Dec. 29 - John Benedict, 59, was killed Tuesday when a piece of coal struck him in the back while he was at work in the United States Fuel mine. A tamper, he had been employed at the mine for 18 years.

Bennett, David William
Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, March 17, 1945
Carbon Mine Explosion Claims Three More, Total of Six

KENILWORTH, -- Independent Coal and Coke Co. Kenilworth mine still was shut down Friday as the death toll resulting from the coal dust explosion in the mine Wednesday afternoon mounted to six.

David Bennett died late Friday in the Price hospital of burns suffered in the explosion. Arthur William Smith and Iven Jensen died shortly before midnight Thursday. Both severely burned by the explosion, Smith was in the Price hospital and Jensen was in the company hospital at Kenilworth.

Salt Lake Tribune, Sunday March 18, 1945
Coal Explosion Victims Still Critical

KENILWORTH - Five miners, victims of the Independent Coal and Coke Co. Kenilworth mine explosion which has claimed six lives, were still hospitalized and in critical condition Saturday.

These men who have been given blood plasma to hasten recovery, are Richard Sarrimond, general foreman; Arthur Lermusiax, Nick Markakis, George Archibque and Felipe Armizo.

The six miners who are dead are David Bennett, Arthur William Smith, Iven Jensen, Gilmer Nielsen, Clem Hawks and Ivan Russell Jackson.

David William Bennett, 27, who died in Price hospital Friday at 8:35 p.m., was born Feb. 24, 1918, in Colorado Springs, Colo. A son of Jerry Samuels and Mary Howelia Bennett.

Survivors include his parents, Colorado Springs, and his widow, Mrs. Rita Kathleen Bennett, Kenilworth.

The body will be taken to Colorado Springs for burial.

Benson, Reid Irven
Deseret News - Jan. 25, 1949
1 Dead, 1 Hurt in Utah Mine Accidents

Kenilworth - Reid Benson, 34, was killed Monday at 6:45 p.m. at the Independent Coal and Coke Company mine Two other men, whose names were not learned, suffered minor injuries

Mr. Benson was killed when coal fell from the mine roof crushing his skull and chest

The victim lived in Kenilworth and had been employed at the mine for about a year. Surviving is his wife Crystal Benson, and six daughters, Constance, Marsha Vernon, Phyllis Marie, Reda Dean, Carol Ann, and Sherilyn Benson

Funeral arrangements are being made by the Wallace Mortuary in Price.

Salt Lake Tribune - January 26, 1949

Price, Jan. 25 - Funeral services for Reid Irven Benson, 34, Kenilworth, Carbon county, who was killed late Monday in an accident at the Independent Coal and Coke Co. coal mine at Kenilworth, will be conducted Thursday at 1 p.m. in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints tabernacle here.

Clyde Worthan, bishop of the Kenilworth LDS ward, will officiate at the services.

Burial will be in the Price City cemetery. Friends may call at the Wallace mortuary in Price any time prior to services.

Mr. Benson was "facing down" a surface of coal inside the mine, when he picked a "key" piece of coal, causing a portion of the mine roof to fall on him. He died instantly.

Injured were two men working near Mr. Benson. They were Joe Lopez, Kenilworth, and Tony Ori, Spring Glen, Carbon county. Both were released from the Kenilworth hospital following emergency treatment.

Mr. Benson was born Nov. 14, 1914, at Clear Creek, Carbon County, a son of John Irven and Marsha Straite Benson. He had worked in various coal mines in Carbon county for the past 11 years.

At the time of his death he was a section foreman at the mine.

Survivors include: his widow, Mrs. Crystal Christensen Benson; six daughters, the Misses Connie Marie, Reida, Carol Ann, Sherily, and Ve Non Benson; a brother and three sisters; Jack E. Benson, Sunnydale, Carbon County, and Mrs. Fanny Larsen and Mrs. Maureen McWarten, both of Monroe, and Mrs. Dora Wright, the Dalles, Ore. and his mother, Mrs. Marsha Larsen, Provo.

Bentley, Brigham
News Advocate, Jan. 15, 1931
Columbia Miner Suddenly Killed by Loaded Car

The first mine fatality of 1931 at Columbia occurred Thursday, when Brig Bentley, 22, of Wellington was knocked under a loaded car and instantly killed. Young Bentley was a driver and when he knocked the props out from beneath the car his horse started quickly and threw him under the car. Walter Knox and Superintendent McCluckey assisted in removing the body from mine room 15 where the accident happened.

The body was taken to the Flynn Funeral parlors where it will be held for funeral arrangements.

The state coal mine inspector will probably make an examination of the case immediately.

Berg, Emil (Emilio Bergamaschi)
Salt Lake Telegram, January 10, 1925
Industrial Board Makes Four Awards

Four awards were made by the state industrial commission Saturday under the workmen's compensation act. The Utah Fuel company was directed to pay to Giovanni Bergamaschi and Celestine Bergamaschi, father and sister of Emil Berg who lost his life in the disaster at Castle Gate on March 8, 1924.

The Utah Fuel company was also directed to pay to Mario Castrale Cibrario $8 per week for 125 weeks not to exceed $1,000, on account of the death of Bart Cibrario, who perished in the Castle Gate disaster. The beneficiary resides in the province of Torino, Italy.

The Royal Coal Company or the continental Casualty Company, insurance carrier for the coal company is to pay to Melba Martucci for herself and as guardian of her child, the sum of $16 per week for 312 weeks beginning October 8, 1924, and from this amount to pay George Constantine $100 attorney fees. Martucci, husband and father, was killed while in the employ of the coal company.

Bergera, Peter
Sun Advocate Sept. 21, 1944
Services Are Held Tuesday Morning For Pete Bergera

Funeral mass was conducted last Tuesday at the Notre Dame de Lourdes church in Price for Pete Bergera, who died in the Price City hospital on September 15 of injuries suffered in a mine accident.

A native of Carbon County, he was born November 16, 1915 at Carbonville, a son of James and Teresa Pagliasotti Bergera. He had spent his life in the county graduating from the Carbon county high school. He was a coal miner by occupation.

Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Ruth Stone Bergera, his parents, three sisters, Mrs. Margaret Pogun, Miss Anna Bergera and Mrs. Chelestina Cadez and one brother James Bergera.

Holy rosary was recited on Monday evening at the Mitchel Funeral home. Burial was in the Price Cemetery.

Berkeley, George John
News Advocate Nov. 2, 1922
GEORGE BERKELEY IS KILLED BY COAL FALL

George J. Berkeley, 34, was killed at Standardville mine by a fall of coal last Friday afternoon. The body was brought to Price and funeral services were held at the Flynn funeral home Sunday afternoon under the supervision of the Provo lodge of Elks. A large number of Spring Canyon Elks attended. The body was shipped Monday to Fairview for interment, Superintendent F. C. Hennis and wire accompanying it, together with the widow and small son of the deceased. Mr. Berkeley had worked at Standardville and Clear Creek for the past twelve years and put in some time at Sunnyside previous to going to Clear Creek. He was born in Austria August 16, 1889.

News Advocate, January 26, 1923
HE HAD TWO WIVES

Following the application of Mrs. Ada Berkeley up at Standardville for workmen's compensation to herself and a minor child for injuries to her husband, George J. Berkeley, alleged to have been received there and which later resulted in his death, the state industrial commission was informed last Tuesday by W. T. Gunter, a Salt Lake City attorney, that Berkeley has another wife in Jugo-Slovakia, and form whom he has never been divorced, who is entitled to compensation. The commission will be called upon to decide the point at issue in a hearing to be conducted February 6th at Standardville.

News Advocate Feb. 1, 1923
TWO WIDOWS ASKING FOR BERKELEY COMPENSATION

Are two widows entitled to work men's compensation for the death of one man, as their husband? That will be the question before the state industrial commission if a claim filed Tuesday is established, and it is without precedent, according to a member of the board.

Mrs. Ada Berkeley of Standardville petitioned for compensation for herself and a minor child for injuries to her husband George J. Berkeley, alleged to have been received at Standardville, which resulted in his death October 27, 1922.

W. T. Gunter, an attorney of Salt Lake, however, appeared before the commission saying that he has knowledge to the effect that the same man, under the name of George Brkjacic, was the husband of Milka Brjkacic living in Jugo Slovakis, from whom he had never been divorced, and a dependent mother in that country Mrs. Brjkacic has never made claim for compensation.

A hearing was held before the commission Tuesday, and has been continue to February 6, at Standardville.

Report of the Industrial Commission 1929 - Claim No. 57 Decision rendered December 15, 1928

Ada Berkeley, applicant for continued benefits from the Employes' Combined Benefit Fund.

On October 27th 1922, George J. Berkeley was killed while employed by the Standard Coal Company leaving a widow, one minor son and an unborn child surviving him. At the end of the 6-year compensation period, Mrs. Berkeley applied for special benefits, which the Commission found she would be entitled to and same were ordered paid at the rate of $16.00 per week until otherwise ordered.

The Sun November 2, 1923
THREE DEATH CLAIMS SETTLED BY THE COMMISSION

In one of three decision last Wednesday by the Utah Industrial Commission:

The two others also are death cases, the defendant companies being coal concerns. A similar payment is ordered to be made to the two minor children of William D. Elder, killed while working for the Spring Canyon Coal company March 6th, last. The children's mother was divorced at the time of the accident, and will not recover. Neither will three children of Elder's second wife now dead, who were his stepchildren. The second marriage of Elder was within six months of the granting of the interlocutory decree of divorce and he never legally adopted the stepchildren.

The Standard Coal company is ordered to make a similar payment to Mrs. Ada Berkeley, widow, a minor child and another unborn child of George J. Berkeley, an inspector for the company, who was killed in October, 1923.

Bernard, John (Barnard)
News Advocate June 17, 1926
Miner Killed by Coal Fall at Castle Gate

John Barnard, 43 years of age, was killed in the Utah Fuel company's mine No. 1 at Castle Gate last Tuesday afternoon by a fall of coal. He was killed instantly; his body and head being crushed beneath the great weight of the fall.

The deceased was born in Italy and has resided at Castle Gate for the past seven years. He has no relatives here as far as is known.

News Advocate June 24, 1926

Funeral services for John Bernard, Castle Gate coal miner who was killed on Tuesday of last week by a fall of coal in the Utah Fuel company's mine, were held Saturday afternoon at Helper.

This article appeared in the newspaper over two years earlier when the Castle Gate Mine Explosion happened on March 8, 1924.
Provo Daily Herald – March 10, 1924
Oversleep Saves Life

The sound slumber of John Bernard is responsible for he being alive today and not among the miners caught in the explosion. Mr. Bernard is the president of the Italian association in Carbon county and is also employed at the No. 2 mine. He was supposed to be at work on the day of the fatality. However, he overslept and rather than come late to work he decided to remain at home for the day. It was with a tear in the eye that he related his miraculous escape from certain death.

Grateful that his life was saved, he has been one of the hardest working rescue men, having gone into the mine three or four times both days to render assistance to his more unfortunate comrades.

(Resource information - He appears in the 1920 U.S. Census in Kenilworth, Carbon, Utah. His age is listed in 1920 as 37. This would make him 43 in 1926)

Berry, Charles Thomas
Salt Lake Tribune Friday Oct. 25, 1946
Carbon County Miner Killed, Crushed Under Coal Fall

PRICE - Charles Berry, 58, Royal, Carbon county, met instant death Thursday at 8 a.m. shortly after going to work, when he was crushed beneath a fall of top coal in the Royal Coal Co. mine.

Marking the 12th mine fatality in Carbon county this year, Mr. Berry's death was the second mine accident at the Royal mine resulting in a fatality during the past six days. Charlie Cihura also met his death at the Royal mine last Friday afternoon when he was struck with falling coal.

Mr. Berry was working on a Joy loader at the time of the accident, according to a report from the mine office, and had no warning of the falling coal.

He was born April 20, 1888, and is survived by his widow, Mrs. Florence Berry, Royal, and four children, Arthur, James Robert, Pauline and Ernest Berry, whose addresses were not listed on Mr. Berry's mine record. He had been employed by the company since 1936.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at the Mitchell funeral home, Price.

Salt Lake Tribune Sunday Oct. 27, 1946

ROYAL - Funeral services for Charles Berry, 58, Royal, who was killed in a mine accident Thursday, will be conducted Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in the chapel of the Mitchell funeral home at Price by Rev. Richard M. Halbert of the Price Community church.

He was born in Hemitita, Mo., April 20, 1888, a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Robert Berry, and had been in Utah since 1936.

He is survived by his widow, Florence Berry, Royal; a daughter, Mrs. Pauline Johnson, Moab; three sons, Arthur Berry, Helper, James Robert Berry, Salt Lake City, and Ernest Berry, Los Angeles.

Burial will be in the Price City cemetery under the direction of the Mitchel Funeral home.

Ogden Standard Examiner - Thursday, October 24, 1946
Price Miner Killed When Roof Caves In

PRICE, Oct. 24 - For the second time in six days tragedy struck in the Royal mine of the Royal Coal company in Carbon county, taking the life of Charles Thomas Berry, 58, a pillar man for the company.

Berry was acting as a joy loader this morning when a segment of the roof caved in on him. He was killed instantly.

Berry, for 10 years a pillar man for the company, is survived by his widow and four children.

A pillar man is one who makes the roof supports and timbering for mine tunnels. However, this morning Berry was not at his usual task. He was operating a joy loader, an automatic conveyor belt machine now in use in mines for loading cars underground.

Berry, William Andrew
Iron County Record, 1924-03-14

Saturday afternoon the people of this city, Kanarra, in fact all over the county were shocked to receive news by telephone that an explosion had occurred in Castlegate, Utah, coal mines, and that 173 men were entombed.

The people knowing that several men from this county were employees at that mine, six being from Kanarra, and one from the Stevens Ranch west of Enoch.

The six men from Kanarra, Willie Pollock, Andy Berry, Ray Williams, Leland Staley, Adlie Wood and Joe Ingram, were each taken from the mine and prepared for burial, the bodies being shipped as follows: Pollock, Berry and Williams, to Kanarra, Stapley to Salt Lake City, Wood to Provo, and Ingram to Overton, Nevada, the last three having made their homes at these cities of later years.

The bodies of the three first mentioned arrived in Cedar Thursday shortly after 11 o'clock a.m. and were taken to Kanarra immediately thereafter, funeral services being held at 3 o'clock.

Bertoglio, Domenico
Salt Lake Telegram, 1924-03-15

Members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Utah who lost their lives at Castle Gate last Saturday follow:.Dom Bertoglio buried at Helper March 13:.

Information taken from Familysearch.org

Domenico Bertoglio was born on February 8, 1876 in Pratiglione, Torino, Italy. His parents are Michele Bertoglio and Rosa Clementa Naturale. When he registered for the draft on September 12, 1918 during the World War one he was living in Castle Gate with the occupation of miner. The description he gave of himself was medium height, medium build, brown eyes and brown hair. On April 1, 1899 he married Gioanna Maria Girot in Pratiglione, Torino, Italy. On January 20, 1913 he married Carolina Rosa Maria Tarrocchio on January 20, 1913. He died with his son Michele in the Castle Gate mine explosion.

Bertoglio, Michele
Information taken from FamilySearch.org

Michele Bertoglio was born January 6, 1906. His parents are Domenico Bertoglio and Gioanna Maria Girot. He arrived in the United States in New York on March 25, 1923 and was 17 years of age. He sailed to the United States on the ship named Dant Alighieri. He had been in the United States for less than a year when he was killed in the Castle Gate Mine Explosion. He and his father are buried in the Helper City Cemetery.

Bettison, (Harry) Henry
FHL film #2055466 item 2 "Obituaries and odds & ends of Canton Register, Canton, Fulton Co., Ill. Jan 5, 1899 to Jul 4, 1901"
May 3, 1900 - p. 2 col. 2

Harry Bettison, the eldest son of William Bettison was killed in a coal mine accident at Scofield, Utah. His Father Wm. Bettison lived at 627 South 3rd. Ave. Canton, Ill. Harry had left home about 8 mo.'s ago & was employed by the Pleasant Valley Coal Co. at Scofield, Utah. Henry Bettison was age - 24 yr.'s on the 1st day of last Dec. He was born in England while his parents were revisiting their native country. But he grew up in Cuba & Canton, Ill. The family had lived in Canton for 13 yrs. (The Obit calls him Harry, then changes to Henry.) His is the 3rd violent death in the family of this widowed Father. Henrys elder bro. - John was drowned in the Illinois river, Sept. 15, 1897. Eighteen yr.'s ago, another bro. a child of 4 or 5 yr.'s was drowned in England when the family was on a visit in the old country. The surviving members besides the Father are 2 sons & a daughter - Earnest & William & Catherine all at home.

May 10, 1900 p.1 col.5

On Mon. Eve., the remains of Henry Bettison, the Canton victim of the accident at the Scofield, Utah. He was killed in a mine explosion. Burial in Greenwood Cemetery, Canton, Ill.

Bianco, August
Ogden Standard Examiner - Wed. Mar. 26, 1941
Mishaps Kill Two Utah Men

ROYAL, March 26 - August Bianco, Carbon county miner, was killed late Tuesday when he was trapped under falling coal as he mined out "pillars" in the Royal mine. He was the third man killed in the mine this year.

Biglow, Emery
News Advocate Feb. 11, 1926
MOTORMAN IN SPRING CANYON MINE KILLED BY FALL OF ROOF ROCK

Emery Biglow, 36 year of age, motor man employed by the Spring Canyon Coal company at Spring Canyon, was instantly killed late last Thursday afternoon when a large rock fell on his head as he was coming out of what is known as No. 19 left, in the mine there.

Funeral services were held in the Storrs ward chapel Sunday in charge of Bishop Charles A. Carlson. Speakers were Duane Hamblin of Price, Bishop J. M. McPhie and Calvin Tuft of Kenilworth, and Bishop Carlson of Spring Canyon. All paid high tribute to the life of the deceased.

The deceased was born at Denning Mexico, December 17, 1891. He was the son of John P and Mary M. Holden Biglow. Surviving are his widow and four children, three, eight, nine and twelve years of age, his parents and one brother who recently left for a mission to the southern states. Interment was in Price cemetery.

Billalis, Constantenon (Constantenos)
Ogden Standard Examiner 12-17-1934
PRICE, Utah, Dec. 17

Officials of the Columbia coal mine continued their investigation today into the death of Constantenos Billalis, 55-year-old miner, who was struck and killed by a moving car Saturday afternoon.

Mine officials said Billalis apparently stumbled and fell on the rails in front of the car. He died two hours later. Billalis had no known relatives in this section. He came here from the Island of Crete, his birthplace, 30 years ago.

Salt Lake Tribune 12-19-1934

Price-Funeral services for Constantenos Billalis, 43, coal miner, who was fatally injured in an accident at Columbia mine Saturday afternoon, will be conducted at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Greek Orthodox church in Price under the direction of the Flynn mortuary. The Rev. Artemis Stamatiades, Greek priest of Salt Lake City will conduct the services. Interment will be in the Price City cemetery.

Bills, John Edmond (Edgar) (Ted)
Salt Lake Tribune June 23, 1946
Worker Dies In Carbon Mine Mishap

Spring Canyon - John Edgar (Ted) Bills, 47, died Saturday about 6:30 p.m. of injuries suffered about eight hours earlier in a mine accident at the Spring Canyon Coal Co. mine. According to mine officials, Mr. Bills was employed as a machine miner. At the time of the accident he was helping the timber man fit up timber in the shaft as a roof support.

A sudden bounce in the roof of the mine caused a slab of rock, weighing about 3000 lbs. to break loose pinning Mr. Bills to the floor.

He was released from the debris 15 minutes after the rock fell, administered first aid and rushed to the Standardville hospital.

According to the attending physician, he suffered a broken pelvis and severe shock which caused death. A fellow worker, Troy Nichols, received a broken ankle when struck by a crossbar.

Mr. Bills was born Sept. 1, 1898, in Central, Utah, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bills. He had been employed at the mine eight years.

Surviving are his mother, Fairview, Sanpete county; his widow, Mrs. Olive Jensen Bills and four sons and daughters, Gwen, LeRoy, Christine, and Ralph Bills all of Spring Canyon.

Salt Lake Tribune June 25, 1946

Spring Canyon - Funeral services for John Edmond (Ted) Bills, 47, who died Saturday evening of injuries sustained in a mine accident, will be in Fairview L D S North Ward chapel Tuesday at 1 p.m.

Mr. Bills was aiding a timber man to place drops in the mine of the Spring Canyon Coal Co. Saturday morning when a bounce of rock from the roof occurred at about 11 a.m. The fall of slab rock pinned him under it, causing a broken pelvis and severe shock, which resulted in his death at the Standardville hospital, where he was taken for treatment.

He was born in Fairview Sept. 7, 1900(?) a son of John and Lydia M. Mower Bills. He resided at Fairview most of his life, working in coal mines and other activities. He came to Spring Canyon five years ago. He was an active union member of the Spring Canyon U M W A and members of that organization will act as pallbearers at the funeral services.

Surviving are his mother, residing at Vernal; his widow, Olive Jensen Bills, and four children, Gwen, LeRoy, C?? and Ralph, all of Spring Canyon; three sisters, Mrs. Estella Pack, Vernal, and Mrs. Ophelia Schanck, Kanas City, Mo., and one brother, Glen Bills, La Sal, Utah.

Friends may call at the home of Mrs. Melba Anderson, Fairview Tuesday until time of service.

Burial will be in the Fairview City cemetery under the direction of the Mitchell Funeral home.

Binch, Robert Sheldon
Sun Advocate, January 4, 1941
One Killed, One Injured In Royal Mine Blast Saturday
Sheldon Binch Dies From Gas; Royal Man Severely Burned

One man was dead this week and another lay critically burned as the result of an explosion which occurred in the Royal coal mine last Saturday evening, about 6:30 o'clock. Killed reportedly by gas poisoning, was Sheldon Binch, 27, of Spring Glen.

The injured man, Glen Petty, 40, of Royal, suffered extensive third degree burns of the face and upper torso, and was reported in serious condition. Fifty other men in the mine escaped uninjured.

Shortly after the blast, State Mine Inspector Jack Taylor of Helper arrived on the scene and took complete charge. After a brief investigation he reported that the explosion had been caused by sudden ignition of coal dust.

From evidence present, Mr. Taylor verbally reconstructed the occurrences that led to the blast. He said that Mr. Petty, truck tender, was pushing a string of cars when they derailed, crashing into timber supports and caving in a portion of the roof. Coal dust which spilled from the timbers was ignited by a wire torn loose when the roof caved.

Binch, motorman, was reported to have been overcome by carbon monoxide gas, called "after-damp", which was created by the explosion. Severely burned, Petty stumbled 100 feet along the tunnel before he collapsed unconscious.

Had the blast been caused by gas alone the explosion would probably have spread and killed all inside. As it was, all others inside escaped and no fire resulted. Some of those escaping waded through water up to their waists while leaving by a rear entrance.

All men had left the mine by 8 p.m., mine foreman W. M. Williams said. Harry Latturner, night foreman, was in charge of the night shift on duty.

Mr. Petty was treated at the Royal hospital and then transferred to the hospital at Standardville where, under the care of the company's physician, Dr. L. H. Merrill, his condition is improving.

Report of the explosion created somewhat of a panic among families having members working in the mine. Cars jammed the scene until rescue and ambulance work became almost impossible. Attempting to stop the increasing number of persons arriving on the scene, Highway Patrolman J. L. Sullivan reached a telephone and called radio station KEUB, requesting that they announce all men had been able to leave the mine.

Salt Lake Tribune, Monday January 6, 1941
Miner Injured In Fatal Blast Remains "Fair" - Services Arranged for Victim of Carbon Explosion

ROYAL - Glen Petty, 40, of Royal, coal miner seriously burned Saturday evening in an explosion in the Royal mine at Royal, five miles north of Helper, remained in "fair" condition at the Standardville hospital Sunday night, where he is receiving treatment.

Mr. Petty suffered extensive third degree burns of the face and upper torso in the blast, which resulted in the death of Robert Sheldon Binch, 27, of Spring Glen, from poisoning due to carbon monoxide gas generated by the blast.

The explosion occurred after loaded coal cars were derailed, knocking down cross timbers from the roof of a tunnel 1200 feet from the portal, and breaking an electric trolley wire used by mine locomotives. A spark from the wire ignited coal dust knocked down by the falling timbers, causing the blast, according to State Mine Inspector Jack Taylor of Helper.

Funeral services for Mr. Binch will be conducted at a time yet to be set, by the Mitchell funeral home of Price.

He was born October 21, 1913, in Hiawatha, Carbon county, a son of John William and Alice Logan Binch, and had lived in Carbon county all his life. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Annabelle Reese Binch of Spring Glen; one son, Sheldon Binch, 3, and onebrother, Henry Binch of Spring Glen.

Sun Advocate, January 9, 1941
MINE EXPLOSION AT ROYAL KILLS ONE MAN: ONE SERIOUSLY INJURED
Sparks from Fallen Line Ignites Coal Dust Causing Blast

Sheldon Binch, 28, of Spring Glen, was killed instantly and Glen Petty, 40, of Royal, was seriously injured in an explosion at the Royal mine last Saturday at 6:30 p.m.

Jack Taylor, state mine inspector, took immediate charge of the investigation following the explosion, and reported that Mr. Petty, a motorman, was pushing a string of loaded cars into a switch when they were derailed. The cars struck the timbers along the passageway, knocking the trolley wire to the floor. A spark from the fallen wire ignited the coal dust caused by the crashing timbers and the explosion resulted. The resulting carbon monoxide gas caused the death of Mr. Binch who was in the direct line of the explosion.

After the explosion, Mr. Petty made his way several hundred feet along the tunnel towards the entrance where he collapsed, unconscious.

Mr. Petty was rushed to the Standardville hospital where it was reported that he was suffering from severe head and torso burns.

The night shift was in the mine at the time of the explosion but Mine Foreman W. M. Williams reported that all the other workers were safely out of the mine by 8:00 p.m. Harry Latturner was the night foreman in charge of the night shift.

Mr. Binch was born at Hiawatha on October 21, 1913. He was the son of John William and Alice Logan Binch and had lived in Carbon county all his life.

He is survived by his parents; his widow, Mrs. Annabelle Reese Binch; a son, Sheldon; 3, and a brother, Henry, all of Spring Glen.

Funeral services for Sheldon Binch, killed in the Royal mine explosion, were conducted yesterday in the Price L.D.S. tabernacle. Bishop Ephraim Muhelstein of the Standardville ward officiated.

Burial was in the Price City cemetery.

Biondich, Matt
Ogden Standard Examiner, Wed. May 25, 1932
DEATH OCCURS

PRICE, May 25 - Matt Biondich, 38, died at Spring Canyon hospital Tuesday of pneumonia, following injuries received Saturday when he was crushed by a fall of top rock in the Spring Canyon Coal company's mine.

Birch, John Leon
Ogden Standard Examiner - Wed. March 12, 1941
MINER ELECTROCUTED

Castlegate - March 12 - Jack Leon Birch, 42, of Wellington, Utah, was electrocuted Monday night when he contacted a high-voltage trolley wire while working in the Castlegate mine of the Utah Fuel company.

Birch, Leo
Roosevelt Standard, Nov. 22, 1928
Funeral Services Are Held Here For Former Roosevelt Resident

The funeral services of Leo Birch were held in the Roosevelt hall Friday at 2 o'clock, under the direction of Bishop Ernest H. Burgess. Robert Lambert pronounced the invocation. A quartet consisting of the Misses Utahna Lewis and Ardis Pack, John E. Wiscombe and Bruce Calder sang. The speakers were Alfred Lublia, Paul S. Manson, and Bishop Ernest H. Burgess. Mrs. Ernest H. Burgess played the funeral march from Chopin. The pall bearers were Clarence, Clyde and Glenn Lambert, Frank Hoyt, Ray Birch and Alfred Lublin. The body was interred in the Roosevelt cemetery by the side of his wife.

Leo Birch died Tuesday afternoon Nov. 13 at 4:15; at the Kenilworth hospital as a result of serious injuries received Monday night when a fall of coal in the Independent Coal company mine struck the miner, fracturing a pelvis bone, crushing his lungs and injuring the scalp. Mr. Birch had been employed at the mine but two months.

Mr. Birch was born at Coalville, Utah, February 22, 1896. He married Ida Lambert November 16, 1926. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Birch.

He was recently in employ of the Eastern Utah Transportation company from Price to the Uintah basin points. Four months ago his wife died at Price, leaving an infant son, who is now in the care of an aunt at Roosevelt.

He is survived by four children, 3 by a former marriage, the following brothers, Oscar, and Ray of Salt Lake City and Devant of Provo and one sister, Mrs. Eliza Welch of Salt Lake City.

Bird, Joseph Rulon
FindAGrave.com contributor

Joseph Rulon Bird was the son of Martin M. and Cecelia Gerber Bird. He married Lucile Dimmick on May 26, 1924 in Price, Utah. He was a coal miner. He was injured in the coal mine in Wattis, Utah on December 27, 1937 and died three days later at Price City Hospital following surgery. He was age 44 years, 5 months and 8 days.

Bishop, Arthur George
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1903-1904 page 134

Arthur Bishop, a miner, was killed in the Winter Quarters Mine No. 1 on September 6th 1904. Bishop's back was broken causing death. Bishop at the time was working with Thomas Hutchinson both being killed.

Copy of Coroner's verdict: That the said Arthur Bishop and Thomas Hutchinson, came to their deaths by negligence, in not protecting themselves, and being in a part of the mine they should not be at the time.

Bishop, Joseph John
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1897-1898, Page 8
FATAL ACCIDENTS

August 9th, 1897, at 2:50 o'clock pm, an accident occurred at Winter Quarters mine No. 1, at Scofield, which resulted in the death of Joseph J. Bishop, caused by the fall of a thin piece of sandy roof rock, very near the working face of the cross-cut in which he and his father had been working, between rooms 8 and 9 of the outside second rise entry. This piece of rock was known by Bishop and his father to be loose, and a prop had been placed to hold it up; a shot had been fired near the right side of the face, and about ten or twelve feet from the prop in question, which was nearest the left side of the face; about ten or fifteen minutes before the accident, the men had returned after firing a shot and about half loaded a pit car. Bishop was working under the rock in question and close to the prop which was set up under it, when both the prop and rock fell, the rock striking him on the head and killing him instantly. This rock and prop had, in all probability, been loosened by the shot, which had recently been fired by Bishop and his father.

The injuries which caused Bishop's death were a compound fracture of frontal, paretal and occipital bones, compound fracture of nasal, superior and inferior maxillary bones.

Research note: born 20 Nov 1876 so he was 20 at the time of death

Bjarnason, Gunnar
Information copied from FamilySearch.org

Gunnar's family emigrated from Iceland when he was a young boy. They settled in Spanish Fork in the "Little Iceland" community. His mother died a few years after giving birth on 4 March 1885. He and his siblings were at the mercy of others to raise them, as their father was away trying to make a living. When Gunnar was older he moved and went to work in a mine at age 16 or 17 called Winter Quarters in Carbon County, Utah.

He married Isabell Muir, 8 February 1900, in Price, Carbon County Seat. Both were 18 years old. Bell's Scottish father and two brothers worked in the same mine. Gunnar worked in the #4 mine. Gunnar and Bell were married just three months when on 1st May 1900 @ 10:28am, #4 mine had an explosion ripping throughout the mine, sending gasses and destruction, killing 199 men including 19 year old Gunnar, John, his father-in-law, 15 year old Daniel, and 17 year old George, his brothers-in-law.

Bjarnson, Henry Peter
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1918-1920 - page 276

Henry P. Bjarnson, an American, 16 years old and single, was killed October 19, 1918, Scofield Mine, by being caught by a fall of coal while loading a car with his older brother, who was his partner.

Bjarnson, Magnus Christian (M.C.)
News Advocate, October 19, 1916
KILLED BETWEEN CARS

Mangi E. Bjarnson, 27, a motor rider at Sunnyside, was so badly injured when he was jammed between cars Sunday morning that he died in St. Mark's Hospital in Salt Lake where he was taken for medical treatment. He leaves a wife and four children besides a brother, Oscar Bjarnson, an instructor in Utah Agricultural college, and his parents, Dr. and Mrs. E. B. Bjarnson of Spanish Fork.

1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

M.C. Bjarnson, age 31, married with 4 children, was a motor rider at the Sunnyside No. 2 mine and was killed October 14, 1916 by moving cars.

Black, Walter Edwin
News Advocate March 12, 1931
Clear Creek Miner Fatally Iinjured by Falling Coal
Walter Black Dies of Hurts Following Mine Accident.

Walter Black, 30, a miner employed at the Utah Fuel mines at Clear Creek, died Friday evening at the company hospital of injuries received in the mine when a fall of coal struck him. He was struck by a large piece of falling top coal which punctured his left lung, fractured his jaw, dislocated his hip and lacerated his body, according to attending physicians. The coal did not bury him, however, and he was immediately taken to the hospital by fellow workers.

He is survived by his wife who lives in Clear Creek. Funeral services were held Sunday at Huntington with interment in the Huntington Cemetery.

News Advocate March, 1931

Huntington - Funeral services for Walter Black, 31, miner, of Clear Creek, who was killed accidentally in the Clear Creek coal mine Friday, were held in the Huntington ward chapel Sunday, with interment in Huntington cemetery. He was assistant superintendent of the local Sunday School and scoutmaster of the ward Boy Scout Troop.

Mr. Black was born December 25, 1900 in Glendale a son of Isaac E. and Elvina Olson Black. He married Miss Reta Childs of Scofield, March 1, 1923 in Price. He came to Huntington with his parents 27 years ago and had lived at Scofield and Clear Creek eight years.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Reta Childs Black, and his father: three children, Walter, Noreen and Delbert Black, six (article ended with no continuation)

Blackburn, Clifton
Salt Lake Telegram, March 11, 1937
Rock Fall Injures Carbon Coal Miner

PRICE - Clifton Blackburn, Price, was in the Price City hospital Thursday with severe injuries received in the Blue Blaze coal mine at Consumers. He was seriously hurt by a fall of rock from the roof.

Research note: Age 27, severed spinal cord, crushed, falling coal at the Consumer's mine. He passed away from his injuries on 28 May 1937.

Blackham, Charles Hershel
The Sun - December 5, 1919
Deaths at Clear Creek are Purely Accidental

Funeral services for the two men killed at Clear Creek on November 26th, last week, were held the following Saturday. The body of Charles Blackham was taken to Orangeville and that of James Wilde to Coalville. Both deaths were due to a fall of rock. The latter leaves five children that are now orphans. They are to be cared for by their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William S. Wilde of Clear Creek. The former is survived by a wife and four children at Orangeville. Everything points to the fact that Utah Fuel Company is in no way to blame for the deaths both being purely accidental.

Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1918-1920 - page 280

James Wilde, an American, 34 years old and married, wife dead, leaves five minor children, who reside with their grandfather, Wm. S. Wilde, at Clear Creek, Utah, and Chas. Blackham, an American, 29 years old and married, leaves a wife and four children, who reside at Clear Creek, Utah, were killed November 26, 1919, Clear Creek, No. 4 Mine, by a fall of rock which they had tried to take down but could not. They started to work under it when all of a sudden it fell, striking them both and killing them instantly.

Bluck, Frank
Report of Industrial Commission of Utah July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922
Page 928-929 - FATAL ACCIDENTS
Coal Mines

Frank Bluck, a Lithuanian, 39 years old and single, was killed October 12, 1920, Clear Creek No. 3 Mine, by fall of rock and coal. Frank Bluck was just starting to work after eating his dinner, when all of a sudden a slab 8 feet 6 inches high fell off the right side of pillar, striking Bluck and knocking him down. A second later a chunk of slate fell from above where the coal fell off also falling on Bluck, killing him instantly. The slate measured 5 feet long, 2 feet wide and one foot 2 inches thick, tapering out to a feather edge. The place where the accident occurred was 12 feet 7 inches wide, 15 feet 6 inches high. This place should have been timbered before allowing men to work in it. Wm. A. Chase and J. A. Totten, had the contract for grading the hoist road. Frank Bluck was working for them but had been hired as a miner by the Acting Superintendent, Wm. A. Shaw.

Bodily, Joseph Irving
Vernal Express, March 14, 1924
Irving Bodily killed in Castle Gate Accident. Vernal Called to Mourn The Loss Of Four Of Her Citizens In Mine Catastrophe.

In what will go down in history as one of the major mine accidents of the country, Vernal loses four of her citizens Saturday when the Castle Gate No. 2 mine owned by the Utah Fuel Company was blown up by three terrific explosions and 175 lives snuffed out.

The first explosion occurred about 8:00 o'clock Saturday morning and with such force as to hurl the iron door of the mine one half mile across the canyon and timbers as far as a mile away, sending the entire concrete front far out. The 18 foot entrance was enlarged to a 50 foot hole.

The cause of the explosion will never definitely be known as there will probably not be a survivor of all who were in the mine. Nearly every one of the victims are married men. There are seven fathers and their sons who perished in the mine.

Besides J. Irving Bodily from Vernal there are O. E. Sander and two sons, who are well known in the Ashley valley having worked for several years at the Pack-Allan coal mine here. Having no relatives here they will not be brought home for burial.

The remains of Bodily were found at 11 o'clock Tuesday night and arrived home Thursday evening. His wife, a Miss Smith, he married after going to Castle Gate to work shortly after arriving home from a mission. Mrs. Bodily also lost two brothers in the disaster all her living male relatives in America, as she is a native of England. Mr. Bodily had been working there for about two years.

Word has been received from Joseph Bodily, the father, who is now in California, that he would arrive for the funeral. He is there for the health of one of his sons and notice had not reached him at first. The time of the funeral which will be held in the Maeser Ward Chapel, cannot be determined until it is known when Mr. Bodily will arrive which will be probably sometime Sunday or Monday.

Vernal Express, March 21, 1934
FUNERAL OF J. IRVING BODILY HELD IN MAESER. HOST OF FRIENDS CAME FROM FAR AND NEAR TO PAY HOMAGE TO VICTIM OF CASTLE GATE MINE DISASTER.

One of the largest funeral services held in Maeser was that for Joseph Irving Bodily, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Bodily, who was one of the victims of the Castle Gate explosion, Sunday at 3:00 o'clock at the Maeser Ward Chapel under the auspices of the Maeser Ward bishopric, with Bishop Sylvannus Colett presiding.

The floral tributes from the many friends and relatives were profuse and beautiful and more than covered the casket of the departed.

Music was furnished by the Maeser ward choir, rendering the following numbers, "I Know That My Redeemer Lives" with Warren Jones, soloist and "Oh My Father." A male quartet consisting of Leslie Thacker, Roy Carroll, Warren Jones and Wells Ashby sang, "I'll Go Where You Want Me To Go" and Mrs. Leo Calder sang a special number, "Face To Face."

Consoling remarks were made by Ray Stringham, John L. McConkie and President Wallace Calder. Mr. Stringham and Mr. Bodily were missionary companions and Mr. Stringham told of the excellent work the departed did while in the field and of the unusual amount of praise he received while there. The other speakers told of the integrity and sterling character of the departed. The opening prayer was by President Ernest Eaton and the benediction was pronounced by A, Theodore Johnson.

A large cortege followed the remains to the Maeser cemetery where interment was made with President Wallace Calder dedicating the grave.

J. Irving Bodily came of sturdy stock, having been born on a farm in Maeser, January 3, 1900, the son of Joseph H. and Alice Fisher Bodily. He grew to manhood in Maeser and Moffat, Utah.

In October 1919 he was called on a mission, laboring in California twenty-six months, where he accomplished a great work.

When he returned from his mission he served as second counselor to Ray Stringham in the Maeser Sunday School superintendence. He went to Castle Gate in July 1922, and had only been there six weeks when he was appointed Sunday School Super indent of Castle Gate Ward. He worked in the Mutual and other organizations also. March 15, 1923, he was married to Florence Smith of Castle Gate.

Besides his widow, father and mother, he leaves the following brothers and sisters to mourn his untimely death: Reed F. Bodily, Sterling, Carl, Owen, Keith and Wilda. One little sister, Alice preceded him three years in death.

His father, Joseph H. Bodily, went to California early last winter taking his son Reed for the purpose of gaining his health and could not leave Reed at this time and was not present at the funeral.

The bereaved young wife was unable to attend her husband's funeral, two of her brothers were also victims of the mine disaster. And her father having died a year ago, leaves her, her mother and sister-in-laws, without any male support.

Mr. and Mrs. Clair Hacking of Lapoint, Mr. and Mrs. John G. Hacking, Chris and daughter Sylvia and Levi Bodily, all of Gusher, relatives of the deceased, were present.

The sympathy of the entire community go out to the bereaved family.

Boetto, James (Boyetto, Jim)
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1915-1916 - page 21

Jim Boyetto, Italian miner, age 30, married, was injured November 29, 1914, in the 2nd west main entry, Mine No. 1, Standardville, Utah and died in the Judge Mercy Hospital, Salt Lake City, on December 15, 1914.

Boyetto was working in the face of the main return airway. Leaving his working place he went into the 2nd west entry, where he was found later by Flory Louis Galgaro, suffering from burns. Deceased stated that he was looking for a foxing for his drilling machine and when near the face of 2nd west entry an explosion occurred, supposedly from a small accumulation of explosive gas. He was taken to the Judge Mercy Hospital in Salt Lake City, where on about the 14th of December he jumped or fell through the window onto the ground outside of the hospital, where he suffered some exposure. He died on December 15th.

Bogdin, (Bogden), George
Newspaper article
SPRING CANYON MINER FOUND DEAD
George Bogden, 35, Native of Rumania,
Found Dead Under Mysterious Circumstances

George Bogden, 35, of Spring Canyon, was found dead at the No. 3 mine of the Spring Canyon coal company at Spring Canyon, Thursday evening at o'clock by Ernest Cullon, a brother in law. The probable cause of death is heart failure but a coroner's inquest is being held at Helper this afternoon to definitely determine the cause.

George Bogden was born in Rumania, August 20, 1893 and was a son of Turza Bogden. He came to Carbon County 13 years ago and was married to Miss Nellie Olson of Spring Canyon. They have four children, Betty, eight; Dolores, six; LeOra, three and an infant of three weeks.

The inquest will be held at Spring Canyon tonight to determine the cause of death. Justice of the Peace George A. Murphy will be in charge.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed pending the action of the coroner's inquest. The body is at ABett's mortuary at Helper and interment will be at Price City cemetery.

Bolonakis, Steve
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1913-1914 - page 18

Steve Bolonakis, a Cretan miner, aged 23 years, single, was killed December 18th, 1912, on the inside end of No. 4 pillar, 3rd Right entry, upper seam of the Castle Gate Mine.

Bolonakis was mining on the outside end of the pillar, the mining being about 2.5 feet deep and 14 feet long. While mining near the inside end, he mined into a slip. Not having any sprags under his mining, the coal became detached from the face at the slip, falling over and crushing him. The slip mentioned, not only went the full height of the coal, but entered the roof measures, and when the coal fell it brought considerable rook rock with it. The intelligent use of two sprags in this undermining would have prevented the accident.

Bonaquisto, Tony (Bonaquisti, Anthony)
1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

Tony Bonaquista, age 36, miner at Sunnyside No. 1 mine, married with 4 children, died April 29, 1916 due to bounce and fall of coal.

Information from Bob and Patti Scarcelli, on behalf of Patti Bonaquisto Scarcelli.

Patti's father was named after Tony and at that time the spelling was Bonaquisti, Anthony (Tony). The name actually went from "I" to "a" to "o" over the years, but it was with an "I" when they immigrated from Castro die Volchi, Italy. You may recall the Bonaquisto family from Columbia. Patti's grandfather was this miner's brother." He was 35 when he was killed by a fall of coal at the Kaiser Utah Fuel Coal Mine on April 29, 1916.

Bonchlakis, Angelo
Report of Industrial Commission
Page 15, Claim No. 1412 - Decision rendered July 19, 1926

Emanuel J. Bouhlakes and Maria Em Bouhlakes, father and mother of Evangehlus Em. Bouhlakes, alias Angelo Bonchlakis, alias Buhles, deceased,--by George M. Leodakis, vs. Columbia Steel corporation and Hartford Accident and Indemnity company

On November 6th, 1924, Angelo Bonchlakis (Buhles) was killed in a cave-in while digging coal at Sunnyside, Utah, in the course of his employment with Columbia Steel Corporation.

The father and mother of decedent filed claim for compensation.

Compensation awarded at the rate of $8.00 per week for a period of 125 weeks.

Research notes: Age 29 died Nov. 6, 1924 due to skull fracture at the McClean, Mutual mine.

Borla, Peter
Deseret News - Sep 19, 1950
Mishap Kills Helper Man

HELPER - A Helper man was killed at 1:15 p.m. Monday when crushed by a string of empty coal cars which pinned him against timbering props in the Royal mine of the Royal Coal Company.

Killed was Pete Borla, 61. Mine officials said he was standing in a tunnel as the string of cars approached but apparently thought the cars were moving on another track.

Mr. Borla was a general maintenance man in the mine, located six miles north of Helper. He recently returned from Springfield, Mass., where he was a delegate to the national assembly of an Italian-American fraternal order.

Family History
Peter Borla 1889-1950

Born January 28, 1889 in Nole, Italy (Piedmont Region in the Province Turin, Northwestern Italy) to Luigi (Louis) and Maria (Mary) Ginzotti Borla.

At the age of 21 years old, Peter along with his mother Mary, age 47, and his sister Mary, age 15, arrived at Ellis Island on May 27, 1910 aboard the ship La Lorraine sailing from La Havre, France.

The final destination was Carbonville, Utah where their father and husband (Luigi) was already residing on a farm he had purchased some years earlier and was awaiting their arrival to Utah.

May 26, 1918 to May 22, 1919 Peter enlisted in the United States Army. By serving in World War I, he was awarded his United States citizenship.

Peter married Jennie Ariotti of Castle Gate. They lived in Castle Gate, Royal, Scofield and Helper.

Peter was active in the unionization of local coal mines and with the United Mine Workers of America.

On September 18, 1950 at 1:15 pm while working in the Royal Coal Mine north of Castle Gate, Utah, Peter Borla was killed in a coal mine accident. The cause of death was due to a workman sending a coal car down a wrong track. The coal car ran over Peter crushing his chest and abdomen and fractured his spine. His death was immediate.

Bourdos, Louis or Bourthadonakis, Lois
Utah Industrial Commission Claim No. 3843 Decision rendered Dec. 15, 1937

Annitsa Louis Bourthadonakis, widow, et al, Lois Bourthadonakis (also known as Louis Bourdos) deceased, vs. Mutual Coal Company and/or the State Insurance Fund.

On October 23, 1935, Lois Bourdos was injured by a fall of coal and was temporarily totally disabled until November 29, 1936, on which date he died. The State Insurance Fund paid compensation, medical and hospital bills and also paid for the burial of decedent in the sum of $150.00. The widow and father of the deceased, residents of Greece, filed claim for compensation. Hearings were held and evidence submitted and the Commission found that contributions made by decedent amounted to a sum not to exceed $24.00 per month and that the applicants were partially dependent upon decedent for maintenance and support.

$2.75 per week for the remainder of the 312 weeks' period from date of accident awarded, same being 50% of the award which applicants would be entitled to receive if they were residents of the U.S.A.

Death Certificate

States cause of death is exhaustion and infection due to severed spinal cord, fractured spine and ?? leion of cord. - Injured in Consumers mine and manner of injuries were crushed back when coal fell on him.

Bozas, (Bozun) Chris T.
Salt Lake Tribune Sat. Jan. 26, 1946
Mine Mishap Kills Two In Kenilworth

Kenilworth, Carbon County - Two miners suffocated Friday afternoon in a mine accident which occurred in the shaft of the Independent Coal & Coke Co., at Kenilworth.

Dead are Edward Vance Grange, 28, Kenilworth, a section boss, and Chris Bozun, 58, Carbonville, a machine man.

According to mine officials, the two men died when a bounce of coal occurred in a solid block of coal and cut the workers off. Artificial respiration was administered by members of a rescue crew for 90 minutes, but they were unable to revive them.

Mine workers said the "bounce" occurred from too much pressure. The accident happened about 3:45 p.m.

Mr. Grange was born Nov. 9, 1917, in Orangeville, Emery county, and had been employed at Kenilworth since 1932. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Leah Grange, and two children. His body was taken to the Wallace mortuary, Price.

Mr. Bozun was born Dec. 31, 1887 in Austria and had been a coal miner the major part of his life. He worked for several years at Kenilworth.

Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Stan Bozun, six sons and daughters, who live in California and Colorado. Funeral arrangements will be announced by Mitchell funeral home, Price.

Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1918-1920 - page 280

Chris Bozas, a Greek, 34 years old and single, was instantly killed October 13, 1919, Wattis Mine, by jumping off an empty trip that was going at a great speed; when he jumped off he fell against a rock which fractured his skull. He died a few minutes later.

Brace, William (Wm.)
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1903-1904 page 44

Wm. Brace, age 22, an American mine laborer, was killed in No. 2 mine at Sunnyside on November 23rd, 1903. At the time of the accident, Brace was employed with two other men widening out the air course. Brace came to his death by a fall of dirt which he was under-mining at the time.

Bradak, Marius Henry
Salt Lake Tribune, 16 May 1945

PRICE - Funeral services for Marius Henry Bradak Sr., who died in the mine accident at Sunnyside Wednesday, were conducted Sunday at the Mitchell funeral chapel. Mr. Bradak was born July 22, 1888, in Flume, Austria, and was amine foreman at the Sunnyside mine.

He is survivied by his widow, Alice R. Bradak; one son, Marius Henry Bradak Jr.; one daughter, Alice B. Hall, and two grandsons.

Bradley, Jefferson
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1918-1920 - page 277

Jefferson Bradley, an American, 35 years old and married, leaves a wife and 5 children, was killed January 8, 1919, on the tramway of the Storrs Mine, by being run over by an empty trip of cars. The rope was off the rollers and while he was trying to put it on he did not observe the empty trip until he was struck by the cars and thrown under the trip. He died 15 minutes after the accident.

Bradshaw, David Claude
Salt Lake Tribune, Wed. Oct. 1, 1941
Cave-in Kills Trackman at Coal Mine

CASTLEGATE - Caught in a minor cave-in Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Utah Fuel company coal mine at Castlegate, David Claude Bradshaw, 32, of Oklahoma City, Okla., was killed instantly, mine officials reported.

Mr. Bradshaw, a mine trackman who began work with the Utah Fuel company two weeks ago, reportedly was walking into a "room" of the mine shaft to lay tracks for trucking work to start Wednesday when a large chunk of coal fell from the roof of the tunnel and struck him on the head.

He was alone at the time of the accident, but other workmen discovered his body within a few minutes, said mine officials. It was indicated Tuesday night that no investigation will be conducted.

Only known relative of the accident victim is a Mrs. Flora Bradshaw, presumed to be his mother of Oklahoma City, officials said.

Brady, Cyrus Heber
Mt. Pleasant Pyramid, 1930-02-14
Coal Mine Explosion Victims are Buried

Cyrus H. Brady, 34, the third Fairview victim of the Standardville mine explosion, was the son of Heber and Jennie Landgreen Brady of Fairview. He received his education in the Fairview public school and the North Sanpete high school. He was a World War veteran. He was married to Miss Eva Anderson of Fairview and they have two sons. Since his marriage he was lived in Standardville. He was planning to leave the mine and take up farming in Wyoming this spring. Besides his wife and sons he is survived by his parents and three brothers, Ilo and Reed Brady of Standardville and Elmo Brady of Fairview.

Brady, Ilo Edwin
Deseret News & Telegram, July 19, 1957
Funeral Services Set for Utah Mine Victim

CASTLE GATE, Carbon County. Funeral services will be held Sunday for Ilo Edwin Brady, 41 of Ephraim, Sanpete County, one of three Utahns killed in a mine mishap here Thursday.

Services are pending for the other two victims, Harold Lee Wilstead, 31, of Castle Gate, and Wesley Bailey, 41, of Wales, Sanpete county.

The miners were killed Thursday morning when deadly gases escaped from old tunnels of the Independent Coal and Coke Co. mine in Castle Gate.

The men died despite efforts of would be rescuers who reached the victims shortly after the accident occurred about 8:35 a.m.

Mr. Wilstead succeeded in rescuing a fourth miner before he died himself.

The three men were working in the No. 2 mine when a bounce or shifting of the earth, described by a veteran miner as "of very unusual magnitude," struck the mine.

So severe was the upheaval created by the bounce that air seals on old worked-out mine entries were exploded. The monoxide gas poured out through the damaged seals, and the three men perished before they could be brought to safety.

Wilstead helped pull another worker, Mike Milovich of Helper, to safety, but as soon as the pair reached fresh air, Wilstead collapsed. Milovich recovered from the ordeal.

The bounce occurred about 8:25 a.m., with a more severe bounce following about 15 seconds later, miners said.

Felt Above Ground

Residents of Spring Glen, Carbon County, about seven miles from the mine reported they felt the bounce that erupted in the mine.

An entire section of cliffs was pried loose near a mountain located behind the mine entry. Thousands of tons of rock and trees were sent cascading into a huge canyon below.

Artificial respiration was given all the miners until Dr. O. W. Phelps, Helper physician, pronounced them dead.

The men were brought out of the mine shortly before noon.

Fairview Native

Ilo Edwin Brady was born Dec. 12, 1898, at Fairview, Sanpete County, a son of Heber and Jenny Landgreen Brady. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Following the death of his first wife, Mr. Brady was married to Edith Olson of Ephraim in December 1951. He is survived by his widow, two sons and two daughters, Robert C. Brady and Mrs. Eileen Della Corte, Sunnyside, Carbon County, Mrs. LuJean Basso, Royal, Carbon County, and Grant Brady, Castle Gate. Also surviving is a brother, Reid Brady, Sunnyside.

Mr. Brady had worked in the mine for 27 years.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Castle Gate Ward, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Friends may call at the Grant Brady home Sunday from 10 a.m. to time of services. Burial will be in Price City Cemetery.

Ex-Navy Man

Harold Lee Wilstead was born at Lawrence, Emery County, July 26, 1925, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Wilstead. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and had served during World War II with the U.S. Navy.

A former employe at the mine, he had returned to work only one week previous to the recent miner's vacation, and had worked only two days before the fatal accident Thursday.

He is survived by his widow the former June Anderson, to whom he was married Nov., 1947, and two daughters, Linda Lee, 8 and Connie, 3, all of Castle Gate.

Wesley Parkes Bailey was born May 26, 1916, in Moroni, Sanpete County a son of Parley and Dorothea Christensen Bailey.

A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he served for a number of years in the Sunday School Superintendency of Wales Ward. He was also chairman of the ward genealogical committee.

Mr. Bailey was married June 2, 1943, at Wales to Vivian Maria Lamb. She survives as do seven sons, Arthur L., David L, Vern L., Danny Michael, Joe and Max Bailey, all of Wales.

Also surviving are two brothers, Max and Jack Bailey of Moroni, and six sisters, Mrs. Elda Maxfield, Bountiful; Mrs. Ilene Petersen, Mt. Pleasant; Mrs. Beth Christensen, St. George; Mrs. Fay Busenbark, San Francisco, and Mrs. Afton Rasmussen and Mrs. Ruth Syme, Provo.

Brahic, Fernand Paul
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1913-1914 - page 24

B. Fernard, a French miner, married, aged 29 years, was instantly killed, August 4th, 1913, in the Fowler main slope, No. 1 Mine, Sunnyside.

Fernand and partner, Alex Boyet, were driving the main slope. They had taken down or brushed the roof rock up near to face of slope, and as was customary, mined the coal on the top or next to false roof rock. While loading out their mining coal, a portion of the false roof rock fell, breaking Boyet's leg and killing Fernand.

Research note: Death Certificate matches as last name is Brahic and first name as Fernard. All other information is correct - apparently coal miner inspector mixed up his first and last names

Brannon, Joseph
News Advocate 1927-08-05
FALL OF COAL KILLS CASTLE GATE MINER
Joseph Brannon, 23 years of age Instantly Killed Wednesday Morning

Caught by a fall of coal, Joseph Brannon, about 23 years of age of Rolapp, was instantly killed Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock, while working in the Utah Fuel company's No. 3 mine at Castle Gate.

Brannon received a broken neck, crushed skull, broken shoulder, several broken ribs and a crushed chest. He was born in England the son of Thomas and Ellen Luddon Brannon and came to this country four and a half years ago and located in Rolapp, where he has lived ever since. He has a mother, father, three sisters and five brothers residing in England.

Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. from the Castle Gate amusement hall under the direction of Monsignor A. F. Giovannoal, with burial in the Price City cemetery. Funeral arrangements are in charge of the Flynn Funeral home at Price.

1929 Report of Industrial Commission - Claim No. 2004 - Decision rendered July 9, 1928

Thomas Brannon, father of Joseph Brannon, deceased, vs. Utah Fuel Company, a self-insurer.

On August 3rd, 1927, Joseph Brannon was struck by a fall of rock in Castle Gate Mine No. 3 and instantly killed. His father, residing in England, made application for compensation claiming dependency upon his son for support. From the evidence submitted it was concluded that the applicant's claim was just and compensation was ordered paid at the rates of $8.00 per week for 125 weeks.

Brecho, (Bersho), Joseph
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1911-1912 - page 27

Joseph Brecho, an Austrian miner, aged 27 years, single, came to his death in No. 1 room, on the 3rd level, off the 11th rise Winter Quarters Mine No. 1, on the 12th day of October, 1911. Brecho and two companions were working on the last pillar and had gone out on the level and pushed in an empty car to the face of the working place. From the testimony given by his companions, a slight bounce occurred, which dislodged about 200 lbs. of coal from the face, near the left hand corner, next to the roof. When the bounce occurred, Brecho was digging up bottoms, and before he could step back, the dislodged coal struck him on the head, inflicting injuries from which he died a few minutes later.

An inquest being held . "That the said Joseph Brecho came to his death by a piece of coal striking him on the head. We find that the deceased came to his death by accident and there is no blame attached to anyone."

Briest, Bruce Steve
Daily Herald, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1937
Miner Is Killed At Spring Canyon

HELPER, Oct. 5 --- Bruce Briest, 20, was killed yesterday when he came in contact with a live wire in the Spring Canyon mine here.

Ogden Standard Examiner, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1937
Miner Killed In Electrical Mishap

HELPER, Oct. 5 - Twenty-year-old Bruce Steve Briest was electrocuted Monday when he backed into a cable a mine car he was operating had dislodged. He was employed as a loader in the Spring Canyon mine.

Briggs, Roy
Piqua Daily, Piqua, Ohio, 12 Feb 1930
Attend Funeral of Brother

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Briggs and family went to Sidney, Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mr. Briggs’ brother, Roy Briggs of Utah. The remains arrived from the West Wednesday forenoon. Roy Briggs was 30 years of age. He was killed by a gas explosion in a coal mine.

Broderick, Angus Clifford
Newspaper article
MINER HURT IN FALL OF ROCK DIES IN SALT LAKE HOSPTIAL FROM INJURIES

Funeral services were held at Sunnyside Tuesday for Adelbert Andrew Van Wagoner, 53, who died in a Salt Lake hospital Saturday from injuries received in fall of coal in No. 1 mine of the Utah Fuel company at Sunnyside on September 7. In the same accident Angus C. Broderick, 30, was killed and another miner slightly injured. Van Wagoner died from bronchial pneumonia which was brought on by injuries to his back. The services were under the direction of J. R. Flynn.

Mr. Van Wagoner was born at Santaquin, September 8, 1873, the son of Ephraim and Cassie Hamilton Van Wagoner and had worked as a miner in this district for some time. His widow, Jennie Van Wagoner, survives.

Broderick, Chris
Salt Lake Tribune, Tue. Feb. 6, 1951
Rock Fall Kills Spring Glen Mine Worker

LATUDA - A 63 year old Carbon county coal miner, Chris Broderick, was killed instantly Monday at 12:30 when he was caught by a rock fall in the Latuda mine of the Liberty Fuel Co. here.

Mr. Broderick, Spring Glen, was crushed by the falling stone as he worked with a crew of miners pulling pillars of coal preparatory to abandoning a worked-out section of the mine.

He was dead before the coal could be removed from his body, fellow workers said.

Other members of the crew were William Beard, Dick Howard, Tony Balone, and E. S. Windsor, none of whom were injured according to G. A. Williams, mine superintendent.

Mr. Broderick was a 10-year employe of the mine and was a member of Latuda Local, United Mine Workers of America.

He also was a member of the Croatian Fraternal Union of America.

He was born at Dalmatia, Yugoslavia, May 16, 1887, a son of Jack and Ann Breie Broderick.

Mr. Broderick was married at Salt Lake City in 1916. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Broderick, and one daughter, Ann Broderick, Spring Glen; and four stepsons, Joseph Myers, Helper; John and Mike Myers, Los Angeles, and Francis Myers, Oakland, Calif.

Brotherson, Nels Douglas
Biloxi Daily Herald, Mississippi, 4-4-1947
Miner Killed

Wattis, Utah - Nels D. Brotherson, 59, a coal miner, was fatally injured yesterday while working to complete safety measures at the Lion Coal Company Mine.

He died of a crushed head and internal injuries when he apparently lost his balance and fell from a tipple into a steel railroad gondola car 30 feet below, investigating officers reported.

Brotherson was employed as part of the crew to improve safety conditions at the mine while it is shut down for the miners' memorial holiday.

Ogden Standard Examiner -4-4-1947

WATTIS - April 4, Nels D. Brotherson, 59, Price, Utah, coal miner, was fatally injured yesterday while working to complete safety measures at the Lion Coal company here.

He died of a crushed head and internal injuries when he apparently lost his balance and fell from a tipple into a steel railroad gondola car 30 feet below, investigating officers reported.

Brown, Thomas
Article

Thomas Brown was killed in the Winter Quarters mine on January 7, 1889. He had worked in the coal mines in Dreghorn, Scotland since he was a young boy, and his son, David, joined him in the mines when he was only 11 because they needed the money. Quoting from his journal, "Boys were deemed especially valuable in the mines because they could get into nooks too small for men to work in to chip out the coal. They went to work before daylight and returned home in the dark of evening. Thus hardly seeing any daylight. It was a miserable life at best."

Thomas arrived in Utah in 1883 and began working in the temple quarry to earn money to send for the rest of his family, but when the family arrived two years later, the family moved to Scofield Utah so he and his son, David could again work in the coal mines.

The two of them were working together when Thomas felt that the spot his son was standing in was unsafe. He insisted his son trade places with him, and had just moved when the roof caved in, crushing and killing him. Thomas was only 49 years old at the time of his death, and it was quite a blow. David was not injured but never returned to the mines again.

Thomas had been planning to leave the coal mines and begin farming in just a few months. At the time of his death, his wife and 14 year old son, Tommy, were living on land near American Fork to meet the homesteading requirement that the land be lived on continuously for a certain number of months.

"The day her husband was killed, Elizabeth told her son, Tommy, that she felt something was wrong; that she was so terribly depressed she asked Tommy to sing to her some of her favorite Scottish songs to buoy up her spirits. Tommy had just been outside when 2 men rode up in a buggy from the telegraph office and told him his father had been killed in the mine at Scofield, Utah and to go tell his mother. The broken-hearted lad asked the men to tell her. But in cowardly behavior they refused to do so. They told him he would have to tell her and drove away.

Tommy sang for his mother and then told her the men from the telegraph office had brought word that his father had been seriously injured in the mines at Scofield and they should catch the next train to there-which they did."

Article written by Robert F. Hays (great grandson)

...Grandpa was working with his own father in the mines. They were working together in this one large area, when Grandpa had an impression he should move. He just stepped away where he had been by his father, when the roof caved in, crushing and killing his father. After that I guess he lost all desire to work in the mines and wanted to leave. I think his father was only 49 years old at the time of his death and it was quite a blow.

Bruketa, Martin
1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

Martin Bruketa, age 40, miner at the Standardville mine, was killed November 8, 1916 by being run over by cars. He was married but no children.

Bruno, Daniel
Salt Lake Tribune Sunday December 11, 1960
Price Funeral for Victim of Coal Slide

Scofield - Funeral services for Daniel (Dan) Bruno, 32, who was killed Friday afternoon when buried under tons of slack coal at Columbia Coal Co., have been set tentatively for Wednesday at the Mitchell Funeral Home at Price.

Mr. Bruno, an employe of the company, was attempting to free some frozen slack in a bin so it could be loaded in trucks when he was killed. He was using a metal pipe and was inside the bin when the coal loosened and buried him under six feet of coal. The accident occurred at about 5:45 pm and it was not until 9 pm that seven other employees found his body.

Mr. Bruno was born July 2, 1928, at Spring Glen, Carbon County to Pete L. Sr., and Mary Joanna Painfetti. He married Darlene Olsen, August 27, 1954 in Las Vegas, Nev. He was a coal miner, member of the Price Moose Lodge, and veteran of the Korean conflict.

Surviving are his widow, sons, and daughters: James Daniel, Susan Louise, and Patricia Darlel, all of Price; his mother, Spring Glen; brothers and sisters: Pete L. Jr and Dominic, both of Price; Mrs. Fred (Mary) Ross, Lawndale, Calif. And Susan Bruno, Inglewood, Calif.

Bruno, Michael (Mike)
Information from FindaGrave.com
COUNTY PAYS FINAL HONORS TO STANDARDVILLE MINE BLAST VICTIMS

The rites for Mike Bruno, 29, were held Tuesday from the Notre Dame Church with interment in Price Cemetery under direction of J. E. Flynn Funeral Parlors. He was born in Iello, Italy. He is survived by his wife Mary Bruno of Spring Glen. - Published in the News Advocate Feb. 13, 1930,

Buffo, Stephano Vittorio
Newspaper Article
MINE FATALITY AT ROYAL RAISES 1941 NUMBER TO THREE

The third mine fatality in Carbon county for 1941 was recorded when Stephano Buffo, 51, died in the Standardville hospital last week of injuries suffered in a mine accident in the Royal mine. This was the second fatality of the year for the Royal mine.

Mr. Buffo was injured when a fall of coal struck him in the back while he was at work in the mine, last Wednesday. He was rushed to the Standardville hospital where he died Friday morning.

He was born June 15, 1889, in Italy, and came to this country before the World War. He served in the American army during the war. He had worked in Royal for 20 years.

Mr. Buffo was a member of the Helper Lodge of Stella d'America.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Katherine Gordon Buffo; three sons, Frank, Steve, and Guido Buffo, and three daughters, Mary, Rosie, and Nellie Buffo, all of Royal.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday at the Mitchell Funeral chapel in Price by Bishop Cecil Broadbent of the Helper L.D.S. ward. Burial was in the Helper City cemetery.

Journal - Helper, Utah newspaper article
Services Held Sunday for Royal Miner Killed In Cave-In

Funeral services were held in the Mitchell Funeral chapel Sunday for Stephano Buffo, 51, of Royal, who died Friday at 2:55 a.m. in the Standardville hospital of injuries suffered Wednesday afternoon in a mine accident in the Royal Mine.

Mr. Buffo was injured when a fall of coal struck him in the back while he was working underground.

He was born June 15, 1889, in Italy and came to this country before the World War, during which he served in the American army. He had worked in Royal for 20 years. He was a member of the Helper lodge of Stella d'Italia.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Katherine Gordon Buffo; three sons, Frank, Steve, and Guido Buffo, and three daughters, Mary, Rosie and Nellie Buffo, all of Royal.

Burial was in the Helper cemetery under the direction of Mitchell Funeral home in Price.

Bullard, Roe H.
Sun Advocate, November 26, 1942
HIAWATHA NEWS

Roe Bullard suffered a broken back and other injuries Friday afternoon at work. He stepped in the track of a moving motor, evidently not seeing it until too late. Saturday he was taken to the St. Marks hospital in Salt Lake City. At that time his condition was reported as serious.

Research notes: He was struck by a mine car on November 20 or 23, 1942. He later died Feb. 22, 1943, age 30

Burdis, Frank
Salt Lake Tribune, Thu, Jan. 25, 1951

Sunnyside - Funeral services for Frank Burdis, 31, Sunnyside, will be conducted at the Greek Orthodox church in Price Saturday at 2 p.m. by Rev. Deonisios Assimakidas.

Mr. Burdis was killed instantly Monday when he fell into the rotary dump at the mine tipple here. He was born June 7, 1919 at Spring Canyon, a son of Steve and Mary Pollhronakis Burdis.

An employe at the tipple for one year, Mr. Burdis was a former partner in the management of the Sunnybowl Bowling alley at Sunnydale. He was a veteran of World War II and had served 33 months overseas in Africa, Italy and Germany.

He was a member of the Helper Carbon post No. 21, of the American Legion.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Ruth Burdis and one son, Stephen Mark Burdis, both of Sunnyside; his parents of Helper, and three brothers, Gus Burdis and George Burdis, Dragerton, and Sam Burdis, Huntington Park, Cal.

Burial will be in the Price City cemetery under the direction of the Mitchell funeral home, Price.

Salt Lake Tribune Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1951
Tipple Mishap Kills Miner at Sunnyside

Sunnyside, Carbon County - a 31-year-old Sunnyside miner was killed instantly at 4:15 p.m. Monday when he was caught in the rotary dump in the tipple of the Kaiser Steel Co. mine here officials reported.

The body of Frank Burdis, mine car dumper, was found by Bill Cave, 27 a motorman of the company's No. 2 mine, who had brought a string of loaded cars to the dump for unloading. No one witnessed the accident and it was not known exactly how Mr. Burdis became entangled in the dumping mechanism, company officials said.

Mr. Burdis was survived by his wife, Mrs. Ruth Burdis, and a son, Stephen Mark Burdis, both of Sunnyside.

The body is at the Wallace mortuary in Price.

Burich, (Borich) Andrew
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1907 - 1910 - page 23

Andrew Borich, an Austrian, 42 years of age, married, wife and four children, was killed at Sunnyside November 24, 1909.

While his partners were taking down some loose rock over the roadway, where they had taken off a skip to throw their track down, and while in the act of pulling the rock down, Andrew stepped under the rock, and the instant he got under it, it fell, striking him on the head. His partners did not notice him standing under when they were pulling at the rock, until just as the rock was falling, and it was too late then to give him warning. These men had noticed the rock being loose some time previous, and had just finished eating a lunch, and went to work at the rock.

Burns, James Milton
Utah Industrial Commission - Claim No. 1442 - Decision rendered July 14, 1925

Olivia P. Burns, widow of J. M. Burns, for herself and Helen Burns, a minor daughter of deceased vs. Utah Fuel Company.

On June 15, 1925, J. M. Burns, while employed by Utah Fuel Company at Castle Gate, Utah, and in the course of his employment was injured by gunshot wounds inflicted by one Robert Marshall, death resulting therefrom on June 16, 1925.

Deceased left surviving him and wholly dependent upon him for maintenance and support his wife and minor daughter, both residing at Mt. Pleasant. Dependent was earning a wage of $40.00 per week at the time of fatal injury.

Ordered, that compensation be paid to them for the benefit of herself and minor daughter for the sum of $16.00 per week for a period of 312 weeks.

Obituary of Matilda Josephine Anderson Burns Bennett 15 Feb 1936, Salt Lake Tribune

...Her oldest son, James Milton Burns, also a former deputy sheriff, was killed while on duty as a guard at the Utah Fuel company mine in Castlegate. He died of injuries suffered when beaten by a negro who later was lynched by a mob.

The Lynching of Robert Marshall

On the evening of June 15, 1925, two young boys ran down the street passing a Negro man named Robert Marshall and yelling "nigger, nigger, pull the trigger". Little did they know that a few moments later Robert Marshall would really pull the trigger of a pistol that killed Deputy Sheriff J. Milton Burns, who was making his rounds as a watchman at the Utah Fuel Company at Castle Gate, Utah.

Marshall fired five shots into Burns and then began to kick him and hit him with the butt end of the pistol, yelling "take that whitie". Marshall then took Burns' gun and roBed his purse contained $40 in U S Currency and a money order for $100, then fled to the hills.

Burnside, John Mitchell
Salt Lake Tribune, Thursday, August 29, 1946
Rock Fall Kills Carbon Miner

KENILWORTH - Mitchell Burnside, 47, Kenilworth, died at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday of injuries suffered in a mine accident occurring at 10:30 a.m. at the Kenilworth mine of the Independent Coal and Coke Co.

According to information received from the mine office, Mr. Burnside was working at his regular duties as a joy loader helper in one of the mine rooms when, without warning, a fall of top rock crushed him.

Both men were taken to the Kenilworth hospital where Mr. Burnside died, presumably of internal injuries.

He was born at Mt. Pleasant on Nov. 5, 1898, and had worked at the Kenilworth mine for the past 17 years.

According to his mine record he is survived by his widow, Si?? Burnside, two daughters, Lois and Madge Burnside, all of Kenilworth; three sons, Bernard and Al Burnside, both of Kenilworth, and Ernest Burnside, now serving with the armed forces.

Burr, William Harvey
Ogden Standard Examiner, Friday Sept. 3, 1937
Cave-In Kills Carbon Miner

PRICE, Utah, Sept. 3 - William Burr, 40-year-old coal miner, died today of injuries received in a Blue Blaze mine cave-in Wednesday.

Burr, employed in Carbon mining camps 17 years, is survived by his widow and five children.

Burton, William Lehonades
Report of Industrial Commission

William Burton, an American, 41 years old and married, has a wife and 5 children and another child about to be born, was killed January 20, 1919, Spring Canyon Coal Company. He was instantly killed by being run over by a D. & R.G. box car that was being pushed in by the switch engine, the tipple was running off coal at the time causing a noise so that Burton did not hear the engine when he made to cross over the track under the tipple.

1925 Report of Industrial Commission Claim No. 10, Decision rendered December 5, 1924

In the matter of application of Mrs. Marian Belle Burton, the widow of William L. Burton, deceased, and as guardian of Milford aged 15, Dorotha, aged 7, Mabel, aged 11 and Viola Burton, aged 9, minor children of deceased, to participate in the benefits of the Employes Combined Injury Benefit Fund provided by Section 140, Sub-section 7 of the State Industrial Act.

On October 14, 1924, the Industrial Commission of Utah received written application from Mrs. Marian Bell Burton, asking for additional benefits under Sub-section 7 Section 3140 of the Workmen's Compensation Act for herself and four minor children.

The Commission found the following to be the facts: On January 20, 1919, William L. Burton of Storrs, Utah was killed by reason of an accident arising out of the course of his employment while regularly employed by the Spring Canyon Coal Company at Storrs, Utah, an employer subject to the State Industrial Act.

That at time of fatal injury decedent left surviving him, his widow, the applicant herein, and five minor children; that the Aetna Life Insurance Company has ?? compensation to Mrs. Burton for the benefit of herself and minor children in the sum of $15.00 per week as provided by law, up to and including the 20th day October 1924.

That on the 17th day of October, 1924, Virginia Burton was accidentally drowned at the Municipal Bath House, Salt Lake City, Utah, who, at the time of her death, was employed by the Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company, earning $13.00 per week. On the date of the hearing and since the 20th day of October, 1924, Mrs. Burton and the four minor children were still in a dependent condition and still in need of financial assistance and of continued compensation sees fits, and that up to date of this hearing said widow of Wm. L. Burton, deceased, has not been remarried.

Ordered that the State Treasurer, as custody of the Employes Combined Injury Benefit Fund pay to Mrs. Marian Belle Burton of Salt Lake City, Utah. Herself as widow and as guardian of the minor children herein named in the sum of $15.00 per week out of the fund, beginning October 21, 1924, said payments to be made upon vouchers authorized and signed by the Industrial Commission of Utah, said payments herein provided to continue until otherwise ordered and directed by the Commission.

Further ordered, that in case said Marian Bell Burton remarries she shall notify the Commission at once and the benefits herein provided for shall cease from and after the date of said remarriage.

Busato, Jack
Salt Lake Tribune, Feb 1, 1950
Coal Fall Kills Helper Man

Royal, Carbon County, Jan 31 - Struck by a fall of top coal while he was at work in the Royal Coal co. mine here, Jack Busato, 21, Helper, was injured fatally Tuesday at about 2:30 p.m., officials reported.

Mr. Busato was pulled from the fallen coal by a crew of eight men who were working nearby. He was dead before they could take him from the scene of the accident to the surface in a mine car.

Company officials said Mr. Busato was at work in an entry when the coal fell on him, breaking his back. The eight man crew nearby had just moved into the entry with a shovel.

Jack Smith, chief clerk, said Jack Phillips, state coal mine inspector: Ray Woodward, superintendent and Leonard Arnett, mine foreman, will investigate the accident Wednesday.

Mr. Busato had worked at the mine since Jan. 16.

He was born in Dawson, N.M. Jan. 27, 1929, a son of Jack and Lena Rodeghiero Busato. Surviving are his father, two sisters, Mrs. Mary Lupon and Mrs. Ena Simone, Helper.

Butler, Milton Emanuel
Helper Journal
Spring Glen Resident Dies Following Illness of Six-Weeks

Milton Emmanuel Butler, 43, of Spring Glen, died Friday, December 22 at the Spring Canyon hospital following a six weeks' illness.

He was born September 23, 1896, at Richfield. For many years he had been a machine man for the Spring Canyon Coal company. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Jean Butler; parents, John Butler of Salt Lake City and Mrs. Jess Miles of Payson; daughter, Glenda Mary Butler, 12; son, Milton Cullen Butler, 4; brother, William Butler, Wellington; and two sisters, Mrs. Pauline Richardson and Miss Mabel Butler, both of Benjamin, Utah.

Funeral services were held Tuesday at 3:00 p.m. in the Masonic temple at Price under auspices of Carbon lodge No. 16 of Free and Accepted Masons of which Mr. Butler was a member. Interment was in the Masonic cemetery at Price under direction of the Mitchell Funeral Home of Price.

Research notes: Death certificate states he died of pneumonia due to a mine injury at Spring Canyon, Carbon, Utah.

Byrge, Thomas Ray
News Advocate Aug 1981

Scofield- Thomas Ray Byrge, 34, Spring Glen, died Aug. 7, 1981, in a coal mining accident.

He was born Feb. 8, 1947, in Price, to Elvin and Beverly Margaret Haycock Byrge. He married Lori Sheri Olivetto. They were later divorced. He married Margarite Elena Garcia Dec. 26, 1980, in Elko, Nev. She survives.

He was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a member of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a member of UMWA, Valley Camp.

In addition to his wife, other survivors include one son, Tommy Byrge, and one daughter, Amber Byrge, both of green River, Wyo.; a step-daughter, Lisa Byrge, Helper; his parents, Helper; one brother, Bill Byrge, Carbonville; and his grandmother, Florida Byrge, Carbonville.

Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Spring Glen LDS Chapel. Fausett Mortuary was in charge of arrangements. Burial was in Mountain View Cemetery, Helper.

Newspaper article
Mine mishap kills worker

Scofield - A miner was killed Friday when he was struck by a shuttle car in Valley Camp of Utah's Belina No. 1 Mine.

Thomas R. Byrge, Price, was working with a nine-man crew about 2:30 pm when the accident occurred, according to Bill Haynes, vice president and general manager of Valley Camp.

The crew was extracting a pillar of coal in the normal course of operations, when he got in the way of the shuttle car, Byrge said.

In the operation, a section of roof is allowed to collapse by removal of the pillars so the coal can be removed.

C

Caesar, Antone (Anton)
Report of Industrial Commission of Utah July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922
Page 934 - FATAL ACCIDENTS - 1922

Anton Caesar, an Austrian, 40 years old and married, has a wife and 4 children, was killed March 3, 1922, in the Standard Mine by a fall of coal while he was standing on gob at end of pillar. He was warned by his partner not to sound the rock as it was dangerous; just then he struck the rock and was instantly killed when it fell on him.

Cailet, Vincent (Caillet, Vincente)
1912 Biennial Mine Report - page 110

Vincente Caillet, a French miner, aged 36 years, (wife and five children) was injured on the second Right entry inside of the slope, No. 1 mine, Sunnyside, on the 30th of July, 1912, and died August 6th, at the St. Mark's Hospital, Salt Lake City.

Caillet and partners were working on the second right entry drawing pillars and were in the act of setting a prop under a piece of loose draw slate, when it fell on Caillet, breaking his back. His partners stated that they had examined this particular piece of rock and knew it was loose and unsafe, but thought that a prop would hold it until they had changed their track near to the face of their working place. The statement of Peter Colombo, his partner, is as follows:

"I work in Room No. 2 off the second right inside slope, where Vincente Caillet was struck by a piece of draw slate, July 30th, 1912. I was working close to Vincente when the rock fell on him. We were fixing to put a prop under it when it fell down. We had sounded the rock and knew that it was loose. When the rock fell, it almost hit me. The rock struck Vincente on the back.

Caldwell, John Elzy
Report of Industrial Commission
Page 134 - Claim No. 2365 Decision rendered January 23, 1930

Mrs. Mary Caldwell, deceased vs. Independent Coal and Coke Company

On Sept. 23, 1929, John E. Caldwell, an employe of the Independent Coal & Coke Company, was struck by a fall of coal from the roof of the mine and died within five minutes after the accident. He left surviving him his grandmother, the applicant herein; she was partially dependent upon him for support.

An award of $8.00 per week for 312 weeks was made to the applicant; burial expenses as provided by law ordered paid.

Calemente, Plutarco (Plutacio Calinenti)
Ogden Standard-Examiner, Sunday December 16, 1945
Miner Crushed

PRICE, Injuries suffered in a mine accident proved fatal to Plutacio Calinenti, 45, Thursday night. Witnesses said he was crushed between a coal mine car and a prop while working.

Research note: Age 63 died Dec. 13, 1945 due to a crushed chest, ruptured left lung in an accident at the Scofield, Union Pacific Mine.

Caligiuri, Domenico (Caliguri, Dom.)
SL Telegram August 2, 1916
Provo News - Mine Explosion Victim Buried

Provo - Aug. 2 - Funeral services for Domenico Caligiuri were held yesterday in the undertaking parlors of Graham & Jones, with Rev. Father S. Killeen of the Catholic church officiating. Caligiuri was taken to the Provo Hospital yesterday from the Spring Canyon coal mine, where he was injured as the result of the premature explosion of a mine shot. His parents are living in Italy. The boy was but 19 years of age.

SL Telegram - August 3, 1916
Blast Hurts Miner

Dominic Caligiuri was seriously injured when an ill-timed blast exploded and he was struck by a mass of blasted material. He was taken to the Provo hospital, where it is said he is suffering serious internal trouble. Caligiuri is an employ of the Spring Canyon Coal company of Storrs and was working in mine No. 1

1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

Dom. Caliguri, age 27, miner, at Storrs, No. 1 mine, was killed July 31, 1916 due to blasting. He was single.

Callaway, Leland "Bud"
Salt Lake Tribune Fr. Jan 14, 1944
Miner Injured

PRICE - Leland (Bud) Callaway, 26, of Dragerton was seriously injured in an accident at the Geneva coal mine in Horse Canyon at 9 a.m. Thursday when a piece of coal fell from the face of the mine, fracturing his pelvis and causing internal injuries.

Salt Lake Tribune Wed. Jan. 19, 1944
Leland M. Callaway

PRICE - Funeral services for Leland Maurice (Bud) Calloway, 26, who died Thursday of injuries received in a mine accident at the Geneva mine in Horse Canyon, will be conducted in the LDS Tabernacle Wednesday at 1 p.m. with Frank Bryner, bishop of the Price Second Ward officiating.

Campbell, Alexander Stewart
Ogden, Standard Examiner, Thursday, May 2, 1918
A. S. Campbell Loses His Life - Instantly Killed in Explosion - Brother of Joseph S. Campbell of Ogden

SALT LAKE May 2 - Alexander S. Campbell, a native of Salt Lake, 46 years of age, was terribly mutilated and instantly killed by an explosion about a mile east of Kenilworth at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Mr. Campbell, who was manager of the Milburn mine, which is situated nine miles northeast of Price and owned by George M. Cannon and associates of this city, had been engaged for some time in the construction of a wagon road, later to be used as a railroad bed, between Kenilworth and the mine.

In a number of cases immense quantities of rock have had to be blasted, and it was in one of these that Mr. Campbell lost his life. According to the advices received in Salt Lake, Mr. Campbell was in charge of the blasting operations and had set off a big charge of explosives. He then entered the blasted area to place a still larger shot, when a deafening explosion occurred and his mangled body was buried under a mass of rocks and dirt.

It is presumed that the explosion which Mr. Campbell was carrying was set off by the intense heat from the preceding shot. George Shirts, a laborer, who was closer to Mr. Campbell than any of the other members of the road force, was severely, but not fatally, injured.

The killing of Mr. Campbell was one of a chapter of accidents in his family yesterday. J. S. Campbell, a brother, was thrown from his automobile near Smithfield and suffered a broken collarbone. He is in the hospital at Logan.

R. Leo Campbell, a nephew, son of R. S. Campbell, was severely injured while unloading trucks at Idaho Falls, and will arrive in Salt Lake today for medical attention.

Mrs. Alexander Campbell is quarantined at her home, 1275 Browning Avenue, because of the fact that one of her children is suffering from scarlet fever.

Alexander S. Campbell is the third member of his family to meet with accidental death. James M. Campbell, a brother, was killed by a Bamberger train about seven years ago, and Arthur M. Campbell, another brother, one of the oldest engineers on the Denver & Rio Grande railroad, met death in a wreck two years ago.

Mr. Campbell was born in Salt Lake March 4, 1872. He was the youngest son of Robert Lang Campbell, who came to Utah in 1848 and was superintendent of public schools for the territory of Utah at the time of his death. He was always in demand in the days of the Salt Lake Musical Comedy company, headed by John D. Spencer, and played comedy roles.

Prior to taking charge of the Milburn mine, Mr. Campbell was engaged in the brokerage business in this city, and previous to that was representative of the J. S. Campbell Wholesale Grocery company of Ogden.

Mr. Campbell is survived by a widow, 1275 Browning Avenue, and six children. The family is under quarantine owing to the illness of one of the children. The names of the children are Virginia, Robert, Alice, Mary, Kate and John.

He is also survived by the following brothers and sisters: R. S. Campbell, George A. Campbell, B. M. Campbell and John Campbell of Salt Lake, and Joseph S. Campbell of Ogden; Mrs. J. H. Clive, Mrs. Frank Taylor, Mrs. William M. Clive, Joan M. Campbell, Miss Aggie Campbell and Miss Annie Campbell of Salt Lake, and Mrs. Moses W. Taylor of Coalville, Utah.

R. S. Campbell, 149 North Main street, will leave for Price this morning to bring the body to Salt Lake. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

The Sun, Price, Utah - Friday May 3, 1918

BODY MANGLED BY EXPLOSION OF GIANT-A. S. Campbell meets sudden death Wednesday Last. Himself and Gang of Workmen Were Making Road From Millburn Property to Kenilworth When the Heat From a Previous Shot Set Off the Powder Intended For a Second One.

A. S. Campbell, superintendent of the Millburn mine, was instantly killed and his body badly mutilated Wednesday evening about 5 o'clock at a point about a mile and a half east of Kenilworth by a blast of powder. H. S. Shirts, a laborer on the work and others to the number of ten or twelve had very narrow escapes. As it was, Shirts was severely, but not seriously injured. Campbell and a force of some fourteen men had been engaged for some time in the construction of a wagon road from the Millburn mine to Kenilworth. Later this road is to be laid with ties and steel for a railway. Campbell was in charge of blasting operations and had set off a big charge of powder. After the firing he went to the place to put in a second shot when the explosion occurred. His mangled body, a telephone message to The Sun immediately after the accident said, was blown probably fifty feet and covered with a great mass of rock and dirt. One leg was severed from the body. The body was removed by the workmen and help was sent out from Kenilworth. The remains were brought to Price and prepared for burial at a local undertaker's. He is presumed the explosive which Campbell was carrying was set off by the heat of the previous shot.

The killing of Campbell," says yesterday's Salt Lake Tribune, "was one of a chapter of accidents in his family Wednesday and Tuesday last, J. S. Campbell, a brother, was thrown from his automobile near Smithfield and suffered a broken collarbone. He is in the hospital at Logan. R. Leo Campbell, a nephew and the son of R. S. Campbell, was severely injured while unloading trucks at Idaho Falls and will arrive in Salt Lake City today for medical attention. Mrs. Alexander Campbell is quarantined at her home because of the fact that one of her children is suffering from scarlet fever. Alexander S. Campbell is the third member of his family to meet with accidental death. James M. Campbell, a brother, was killed by a Bamberger train about seven years ago, and Arthur M. Campbell, another brother and one of the oldest engineers on the Denver and Rio Grande met death in a wreck two years ago.

Alexander R. Campbell was born in Salt Lake March 4, 1872. He was the youngest son of Robert Lang Campbell, who came to Utah in 1848 and was superintendent of public schools for the territory of Utah at the time of his death. He was always in demand in the days of the Salt Lake Musical Comedy company, headed by John D. Spencer, and played comedy roles.

Prior to taking charge of the Milburn mine, Mr. Campbell was engaged in the brokerage business in this city, and previous to that was representative of the J. S. Campbell Wholesale Grocery company of Ogden.

Deceased is survived by a widow and six children. The family is under quarantine owing to the illness of one of the children. The names of the children are Virginia, Robert, Alice, Mary, Kate and John. He also is survived by five brothers and seven sisters. They are R. S. Campbell, B. M. Campbell, George A. Campbell, and John Campbell of Salt Lake, and Joseph S. Campbell of Ogden; Mrs. J. H. Clive, Mrs. Frank Taylor, Mrs. William M. Clive, Joan M. Campbell, Miss Aggie Campbell and Miss Annie Campbell of Salt Lake, and Mrs. Moses W. Taylor of Coalville, Utah. R. S. Campbell of Salt Lake City came to Price yesterday to take the body home. The dead man had been in and out of Price about six months and during his residence here had made many good friends among those with whom he came in contact.

Cappas, Anton
1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

Antone Cappas, age 40, miner at Sunnyside No. 1 mine, single, died June 8, 1916 due to a bounce and fall of coal.

Cappelletti, Guiseppi (James)
Find A Grave

Giuseppe Cappelletti was born in Turbigo, Milano, Italy, July 26, 1898, the son of Antonio and Giovannia Mozzucchelli Cappelletti. He was a coal miner working for Utah Fuel Company at Castle Gate, Utah. He was one of the victims of the Castle Gate Mine disaster of March 8, 1924. He died at 25 years, 4 months and 12 days of age.

(Note: Headstone and Cemetery records show Cappelletti Guiseppi, so that Guiseppi has been recorded as his last name)

Mother living in Italy Will Get Compensation

The Utah Fuel company was directed to pay Giovannina Cappelletti, who lives in Torbigo, Province of Milano, Italy, the sum of $8 per week for a period of not to exceed 125 weeks by the state industrial commission in session at Salt Lake Saturday, on account of the death of her son in the Castle Gate mine disaster on March 8, 1924.

The company was also ordered to pay to Henry Ruggeri of this city the sum of $50 representing attorney's fees the amount to be deducted from the amount allowed the mother. Published in the News Advocate, February 19, 1925.

Burial -- Mountain View Cemetery, Helper, Utah.

Cappelletti, Mario
Find-A-Grave

Mario Cappelletti was born in Italy, a son of Louis & Mary Bodini Cappelletti. He married Josephine Nava. He was a coal miner working for Utah Fuel company at their Castle Gate mine, and was among the victims of the mine disaster there on March 8, 1924. He was about 35 years of age.

Carlson, John
1914 Biennial Mine Report - page 117

John Carlson, American, aged 45, married, (wife and two children), was injured on the main hoisting slope, Aberdeen seam of the Kenilworth mine, January 2, 1914, from the results of which he died at St. Mark's Hospital, Salt Lake City, January 3rd.

Mr. Carlson was employed as brattice man, and had been sent by foreman to repair a stopping on the eighth left entry. To secure lumber for this work, Carlson apparently walked down the hoisting slope, instead of the mainway (an act which is forbidden, except to those who have work on slope). When the rope runner had secured a trip at the ninth left, the engineer was signaled to hoist. As the trip was being pulled out of the level, the rope slipped from a 45-degree roller, placed on the slope at this point to assist the trip around the curve. The rope with the weights of the trip on it, struck the west rib, and as Carlson was found on the west side of tract it is apparent that the rope flying over the rib, knocked him down, rendering him unconscious. He was lying near enough to the track for the loaded trip to catch and drag him some forty feet up the slope before releasing him.

Carnesecca, John
Daily Herald Thur. Nov. 16, 1939
Two Killed on D. & R G Track

Price - Nov. 16, John Carnesecca, 26, and Mike Tzagarakis, 52, Kenilworth miners, were killed late yesterday when struck by a locomotive that was backing down a curved section of the Denver & Rio Grande railroad right-of-way near here. Authorities said the men apparently did not see the engine approaching and failed to get off the tracks. Both were badly mangled.

There were no witnesses to the accident which happened about 2:15 pm just south of the Kenilworth coal tipple.

Morgan Lock, brakeman, discovered the fatalities when he saw the lunch boxes of the men alongside the mainline and investigated.

Daily Herald Friday, Nov. 17, 1939

Mapleton- Funeral services for John Carnesecca, 26, Mapleton who was fatally injured Wednesday afternoon when struck by a Denver and Rio Grande Western railroad freight engine at Kenilworth, will be contracted Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at Catholic church in Provo, where high mass will be celebrated. The rosary will be recited Friday at 8 p.m. at the home of the parents.

LDS Services also will be conducted Saturday at 2 p.m. in the Mapleton ward chapel.

Friends may call at Claudin Funeral home until 7 p.m. Friday when the body will be taken to the parent's home. Burial will be in Evergreen Cemetery.

He was born in Sunnyside, October 8, 1913, a son of Joseph and Clementina Morri Carnesecca. He had spent most of his life at Mapleton and graduated from Springville high school in 1932. He married Theda Seick March 13, 1933 at Provo. He moved to Kenilworth six weeks ago, to work for the Independent Coal and Coke company of that town.

Surviving besides his widow are two sons and a daughter, Marvin, Herbert, and Larene Carnesecca; his parents of Mapleton; six brothers and sisters, Edigio, Joe and Frank Carnesecca, Mrs. Helen Flowers and Lena Carnesecca of Mapleton, and Mrs. Della Smith of Springville.

Utah Industrial Commission - Claim No. 4238, Decision Rendered Feb. 15, 1940

John Carnesecca, while in the course of his employment, on the employer's premises in Carbon County, Utah was struck and run over by a train operated by the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad Company, the accidental injury resulting in his death the same day. He left surviving him his wife and three minor children residing at Mapleton, Utah, all dependent upon him for maintenance and support.

The employer, upon receipt of assignment of cause of action against the third party causing the injury, was ordered to pay compensation at the rate of $20.80 per week for a period of six years following date of death of John Carnesecca, together with $150.00 as statuary burial expense.

Carnevale, Nick (Carnivole)
1916 Report of Coal Mine Inspector page 160

Nick Carnivole, age 19, driver at Sunnyside No. 1 Mine, died November 16, 1916 due to fall of rock. He was single.

Carpio, Joe (Jose)
Salt Lake Telegram, May 14, 1927
Compensation Awarded for Two Death Cases

Two awards for workmen's compensation, one for the maximum amount of $16 per week for a period of 312 weeks, were made on Friday by the state industrial commission. Mrs. Lavon Bates will receive this amount from Joe Merrill, a contractor, in whose employ Mr. Bates was when he met with a fatal accident.

The second award was to Juana de Carpio of $8 a week for a period of 312 weeks, to be paid by the Utah Fuel company for the death of her husband, who perished while in the employ of the fuel company.

Research notes: Death certificate states his name as Joe Carpio and died of an accident at Castle Gate Mine. Another source states his name was Jose Carpio and he died at the Utah Fuel Mine. Death date listed as 18 September 1926, age 39

Carr, Sam
Salt Lake Tribune Wed. Sep 12, 1945
Mishap Kills Miner

PRICE - Sam Carr, 59, was killed in an accident in the Columbia, Carbon county, mine Tuesday at 6:15 p.m. reported J. O. Peterson, safety engineer of the Columbia Steel Co.

Carras, (Karakatsanis), Angelo
Utah Industrial Commission - Claim No. 3995 - Decision rendered March 4, 1940

Maria Karakatsanis, mother of Angelos Karakatsanis (Angelo Carras), deceased, vs. Columbia Steel Company, a self-insurer.

Angelo Carras was employed in defendant's coal mine at Columbia, Utah. He received accidental injury when he was squeezed between a loading machine and the rib of the mine on December 14, 1937. His injury resulted in death on December 28, 1937. For several years prior to his fatal injury he had been contributing to the support of his father and mother who resided in Greece. Since the date of the death of Angelo Carras, his father Kosmas Karakatsanis, has also died. The contributions made were sufficient to entitle the mother to compensation at the rate of $25.00 per month for a period of 66 months following December 28, 1937.

Compensation awarded, total payments not to exceed the sum of $1,650.00

Casaday (Cassady), William Everton
Auto Accident Fatal to Miner of Castle Gate

William Everton Cassady, a miner of Castle Gate, who was struck by an auto driven by Jake Neff of Scofield at Castle Gate last Thursday afternoon, died during the night from injuries received in the accident. He was fifty four years of age and had made his home in Castle Gate for the past twelve years. When the accident occurred he was carrying a bale of hay across the road from the Utah Fuel company's warehouse. Neff who was driving close behind another car and did not see Cassady when he turned out sharply to pass the car in front of his own, struck and ran over him. Cassady was taken to his home immediately where Dr. C. E. McDermaid found that the back had been broken, the skull fractured and the chest crushed. The man died after some ten hours of suffering.

Mr. Cassady was born at Thompsons March 20, 1870. He is survived by the widow and nine children. Funeral services were held from the Castle Gate meeting house Monday afternoon, Bishop B. F. Thomas officiating, and interment was made in the old cemetery between Price and Wellington.

The Sun September 28, 1923
KILLED BY AN AUTO - Employe of Utah Fuel Company Meets Death In Unusual Manner.

Working yesterday with several other men unloading hay from a car on a siding at Castle Gate William Cassiday was crossing the paved highway carrying a bale when he stepped in front of a passing automobile and was so badly injured that he died less than twelve hours later. The accident happened early in the afternoon. He was brought to Price and cared for at Winters Hospital. His skull was fractured, several ribs broken and he suffered other injuries. He passed away shortly after midnight. Cassiday-with a bale of hay on his shoulder-was about to cross the road when he waited for an approaching machine to pass. A second automobile, driven by Jacob Neff of Scofield, was following closely behind and was evidently not seen by Cassiday as he stepped directly in front of it so quickly that the driver was unable to avoid hitting him. He was in the employ of the Utah Fuel company and lived at Castle Gate with his family. An inquest to determine the exact circumstances will be held tomorrow (Saturday) morning.

Utah Industrial Commission, Claim No. 892, Decision rendered March 3, 1924

Mary Babcock Casaday, widow of William E. Casaday, deceased applicant, vs. Utah Fuel Company, defendant.

Alleged, that on September 27, 1923, William E. Casaday was in the employ of defendant company; that on said date he was carrying a bale of hay from a railroad car to the mine car across the road, when he was struck by an automobile driven by one Jacob Naef; that said employee sustained fractured skull and other injuries from which he died September 28, 1923; that applicant and seven minor children survive decedent and at the time of said injury were dependent upon him for their support and maintenance.

Defendant company admitted all the allegations of applicant.

Compensation ordered paid to applicant for the benefit of herself and minor children.

Chagarakis, Christ
Death Certificate:

Age 35 died December 11, 1916 due to a roof fall at the Castle Gate Utah Fuel company mine. He was born June, 1881 to Mike and Mary Kalikapolas Chagarakis. Cause of death was fracture of skull due to coal falling, accidentally on him while at work in the mine at Castle Gate. He died within a few minutes after the accident. He was buried in Helper, Utah. He had been in Utah for six months.

Chapman, James Elsdon
Ogden Standard Examiner May 31, 1945
Motorman Killed

Sunnyside, Utah - May 31 James Chapman, a motorman for the Utah Fuel Co. at its Sunnyside mine, was killed yesterday in an accident in the mine. Chapman, hauling a load of timber, was crushed by a tie which struck a cross bar in a mine tunnel.

Charter, Thomas William
News Advocate March 5, 1925
Thomas Charter is Buried at Provo

Funeral services for Thomas W. Charter, 29, who was accidently killed in the Black Hawk mine at Hiawatha Saturday, were held in the Provo City Cemetery Wednesday noon.

The services were under the direction of the Provo lodge of Elks, Charter having been a member of the Delta Lodge in Colorado.

Mr. Charter was born January 15, 1896 at Crested Butte, Colo, and had been a resident of Carbon county for the past four years. Death was caused by being crushed by coal cars in the mine workings.

Surviving him are his mother, his widow, Mrs. Elsie Charter, one daughter, and his sister, Mrs. Albert Kirk Patrick of Price.

Chavis, Anthony Joseph
Daily Herald, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1937
Services Set For Anthony J. Chaves

Funeral services for Anthony Joseph Chaves, 44, of Springville, fatally injured in a coal mine accident at Clear Creek Wednesday, will be conducted Saturday at 2 p.m. in the Fourth ward chapel. Friends may call at the residence, Fourth North and Fourth East.

Mr. Chaves was born in Los Angeles February 13, 1893. As a young man he moved to Utah, where he engaged in mining. He married Elizabeth Amelia Chaves June 28, 1917. In 1923 they moved to Springville from Clear Creek.

Surviving are the widow; one son, Don; and three daughters, Mrs. Venese Jeffs and DeLoa and LePriel Chaves, all of Springville. Burial will be in the Evergreen cemetery.

Chioges, Tax (Choingas, Tax)
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1909-1910 page 17 and 18

Tax Choingas, Greek, age 31, married, one child, was killed at Castle Gate mine, April 9, 1909.

Deceased was loading a car at the face under a piece of rock that all of them, he and his partners, knew was dangerous, as per testimony and statement. The rock fell on him, striking him on the head, and knocking him against the car, killing him.

Inquest was held and verdict rendered: The said man came to his death through neglecting his own safety by working under rock that he knew as loose, and in an unsafe condition.

Miner is Killed at Castle Gate - newspaper article

Castle Gate, Utah April 13 - T. Chongas, a Greek miner, was killed here last Friday by falling rock in the mines. The company is exonerated from any blame.

Chokas, Gust
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1911-1912 - page 28

Gus Chokas, a Greek miner, aged 36 years, wife and four children, was killed in the first East entry, Royal Blue mine, Kenilworth, October 31st, 1911. Chokas and his brother, Theo. Chokas, had loaded two cars of coal from a slant they were driving to the back entry. When the driver made his first trip into the face of entry, he told Chokas to have the cars ready by the time he had taken a car to an outside room. As was the custom, the miners started the loaded cars out to where the driver was in the clear, it being down grade from the entry where the Chokas brothers were working to where the drivers picked up the cars. It is presumed that the Chokas brothers had spragged the first car and blocked the wheels of the second car, which stood some four feet from the first on the inbye side of entry. Taking out the blocks from the wheels of the inside car, they attempted to let the inside car down to couple on the first or outside car, thus hitting the outside car with sufficient force to cause it to run down the grade towards the parting. It is apparent that they were unable to stop the second car, but had attempted to stop it by holding onto it, one on either side. Gus Chokas was on the upper side, or partly in front of the car on the upper side, when he stumbled and fell, his left arm being nearly severed by the front wheel. His left leg was found between the front and hind wheels. His head had also come in contact with the front wheel, crushing his skull and tearing off an ear.

Christensen, Edward (Edwin)
News Advocate 1930-10-23
Injuries Fatal to Coal Loader

Edwin Christensen, 56, a loader in the Standardville mine died about 11 o'clock Friday night of injuries received in a fall of rock at ten o'clock that morning. Death was due to a fractured skull, crushed chest and other injuries. He died in the Standardville hospital.

Funeral services were held from the J. E. Flynn funeral chapel Tuesday afternoon, and interment was made in the Price cemetery. Christensen was born February 13, 1874 in Fairview the son of Chris and Elsie Nelson Christensen. He is survived by a wife and two adopted children in Sparks, Nev., a daughter, Elsie Sparks, Nevada; a daughter, Mrs. Elsie Bauer of Rexburg, Idaho, a son, Lewis Christensen of Sparks, Nevada and a sister, Mrs. Annie White of San Francisco, California.

Services were conducted by George Mathis of Price. Speakers were Bishop Rueben Brasher of Lawrence, John Potter and Mr. Mathis of Price.

News Advocate January 22, 1931
Widow Gets Award After Mine Death

Mrs. Lucretia Christensen, Sparks, Nev., was awarded $4992 compensation for the accidental death of her husband, Edward Christensen, in a cave in at the Standard Coal company mine at Standardville October 17, by the Industrial Insurance Commission Thursday.

The company, a self-insurer, was ordered to pay the compensation at the rate of $16 per week for 312 weeks.

Christensen, Peter Angelo
Coal Mine Worker Dies From Injury

MOUNT PLEASANT Oct. 3 - Relatives of Angelo Christensen were advised Wednesday evening of his death while being taken to a Salt Lake hospital after having been run over by a coal car at a mine in Clear Creek.

Mr. Christensen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Christensen, was born at Moroni, April 27, 1876. He was married to Miss Mary Fescher of Mt. Pleasant in 1903. She died in 1919, leaving him with seven children, all of whom survive. They are Theodore Christensen who is laboring in Prescott, Ariz., as an L D S Missionary; Kenneth and Ralph of Chester, Bernice, Irene and Malben of Moroni, Evan of McCornick and Earl of Mount Pleasant. He is also survived by his parents and several brothers and sisters.

The body will be brought to Moroni for funeral services and to Mount Pleasant for burial.

1925 Report of Industrial Commission Claim No. 1276 Decision rendered December 5, 1924

M. Bernice Christensen, Irene Ida Christensen, Lee Christensen, Evan F. Christensen and Ralph Christensen, by Ernest R. Christensen, guardian vs. Utah Fuel Company.

On September 30, 1924, while regularly employed by Utah Fuel Company at Clear Creek, Utah, Peter Angelo Christensen, also known as Angelo Christensen, was injured by an accident resulting in his death on the 1st day of October, 1924. Deceased left surviving him his sole and only dependents five minor children named in the title of this cause. Petitioner was duly appointed guardian of the estates and persons of the above named on the 18th day of October, 1924, in the sixth Judicial District court in and for Sanpete County, Utah.

Decedent was paid a wage at the time of his accidental death sufficient to entitle those dependent upon him to the maximum compensation provided by the law.

Ordered, that compensation be paid by the Utah Fuel Company to Ernest R. Christensen of Chester, Utah, guardian and for and on behalf of the minor children of the deceased, Peter Angelo Christensen, in the sum of $16.00 per week for a period not to exceed 312 weeks, that defendant be required to pay for the burial of the decedent as provided by law.

Christian, Ralph Oglethorpe
Beaver Weekly Press, October 21, 1927
FORMER BEAVER MAN KILLED AT CASTLEGATE

Ralph Christian, born and raised in Beaver, was instantly killed by falling slate in mine No. 2, of the Utah Fuel company at Castlegate, Monday, Oct. 17th.

The remains were brought to Beaver by the wife and relatives Thursday and funeral services were conducted at the chapel at 2:00, attended by a large gathering of friends and relatives, after which interment was made in Mountain View cemetery.

Ralph Christian was born in Beaver, April 11, 1883, a son of Dr. John Ward Christian and Adeline Mathews Christian. He was united in marriage to LaPriel Hyatt, July 17th, 1918, and leaves a wife and three sons: DeWard, age 8 years; Gordon Ralph, age 7 years, and Wallace J., age 6 years.

Mr. Christian's sister, Miss Vie Christian, from Seattle, Wash., was visiting in Beaver at the time of the accident and was present at the funeral. A brother, who is a merchange at Pioche, and family, where also among the out-of-town relatives present.

The family have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in their bereavement.

Christiansen, (Christianson), Andrew
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1901-1902

Andrew Christenson, waterman in Winter Quarters Mine No. 1 was killed on the 24th day of October, 1901. Christenson was watering the rooms and entries on the farish level, about 9:50 p.m. He left his hose and entered the room of Andrew Beday and John Schenak, which was about 650 feet from where he left his hose. While standing in this room by the end of a mine car, talking to Beday and Schenak, some coal fell from the roof, striking Christenson on the head and back, causing lacerated wound over small of back and over region of kidneys, lacerated wound on scalp from which he died at 10 o'clock, Oct. 25, 1901. Following is a report of coroner's jury:

At an inquest having been held at the residence of Reese Phillips, in Winter Quarters Precinct, Carbon County, on the 26th day of October, 1901, before J. W. Bowman, Justice of the Peace for said Precinct and County, upon the body of Andrew Christianson, there lying dead by the jurors, whose names are hereunto subscribed, and said jurors upon their oath do say, that Andrew Christianson came to his death by an accidental falling of coal at the Pleasant Valley Coal Company, Winter Quarters Mine No. 4, on the night of October 24th, 1901. No blame is attached to the Company or anyone connected therewith.

Christiansen, Torval L.
Herald Journal April 28, 1970
Mine Accident Fatal to One

HIAWATHA, Carbon County - A train mishap at the Hiawatha Mine of United States Fuel Co., killed one man and injured another Monday.

Torval Christiansen, 47, Hiawatha, was killed when he leaped from an electric locomotive into the path of an oncoming railcar in the mine. Seriously injured was Alonzo P. Oveson, 58, Cleveland, Emery County.

A mine spokesman said both men were employed as masons and were constructing a ventilation overpass inside the mine.

Christiansen was operating the electric locomotive which was laden with materials. He lost control of the train and it began to roll back toward the switch area. Christiansen jumped from the locomotive into the path of a train on an adjacent track.

Chulas, Louis
Death Certificate

Louis, age 47, died May 23, 1937 due to toxic myocarditis erysipelas due to fractures of femor, multiple fractures of spine and various other parts of his body due to a roof fall that occurred Feb. 23, 1937 at the Sweet Mine. He was born July 20, 1889 in Greece. Buried in the Price City Cemetery.

Ciaflaenes, John
Death Certificate

Died December 1917 at Kenilworth, Carbon, Utah mine. Cause of death was fracture of the vertebrae in region of the tenth vertebrae with complete luxation of involved vertebrae caused by falling coal in coal mine. He was single and born in 1892 making him 25 years of age. He was buried in the Spring Glen Cemetery.

Cihurra (Cihuras), Charles
Salt Lake Tribune, Friday October 18, 1946
Roof of Mine Falls, Kills Carbon Miner

ROYAL - The second mine fatality in less than a week and the 11th in Carbon county this year occurred Thursday when Charlie Cihuras, 50, Walsenburg, Colo., died at 3:45 p.m. from injuries suffered about one hour earlier in the Royal Coal Co. mine at Royal.

Mr. Cihuras was loading coal in the mine when about 400 pounds of coal from the mine roof caved upon him, causing multiple rib fractures and a punctured lung. The victim was rushed to the company hospital at Standardville, Carbon county, where he died. Immediate cause of death was shock, hospital attendants announced.

Personal records were not available Thursday evening, but it is believed Mr. Cihuras is survived by a widow and four children in Walsenburg.

An investigation of the accident will be made Friday by state mine inspectors.

The body was taken to the Mitchell funeral home, Price.

Ogden Standard Examiner, Friday, Oct. 18, 1946
Mine Cave-in Fatal

ROYAL, Oct. 18 - Charlie Cihuras, 50, of Walsenburg, Colo., was fatally injured yesterday in a coal mine cave-in. Hospital attendants said the immediate cause of death was shock. The accident was the 11th mine fatality in Carbon county this year.

Salt Lake Tribune, Sat. Oct. 19, 1946

PRICE - Funeral services for Charlie Cihura, 56, of Walsenburg, Colo., who was fatally injured Thursday in a coal mine accident at Royal, Carbon county, will be held at Walsenburg. The date of the funeral has not yet been set.

Mr. Cihura died Thursday at 3:45 p.m. in a Standardville hospital of injuries received an hour earlier when he was crushed beneath a fall of coal.

He was born in Austria on Nov. 4, 1889, and had been working at Royal only since Sept. 9 of this year.

He is survived by his widow, Anna Cihura; six sons and daughters, Mary, Charlie Junior, George, Walter, Stanley and Jim, all of Walsenburg.

Cirbairo, Bert (Bartolomeo Cibrario)
Salt Lake Telegram, January 10, 1925
Industrial Board Makes Four Awards

Four awards were made by the state industrial commission Saturday under the workmen's compensation act. The Utah Fuel company was directed to pay to Giovanni Bergamaschi and Celestine Bergamaschi, father and sister of Emil Berg who lost his life in the disaster at Castle Gate on March 8, 1924.

The Utah Fuel company was also directed to pay to Mario Castrale Cibrario $8 per week for 125 weeks not to exceed $1,000, on account of the death of Bart Cibrario, who perished in the Castle Gate disaster. The beneficiary resides in the province of Torino, Italy.

The Royal Coal Company or the continental Casualty Company, insurance carrier for the coal company is to pay to Melba Martucci for herself and as guardian of her child, the sum of $16 per week for 312 weeks beginning October 8, 1924, and from this amount to pay George Constantine $100 attorney fees. Martucci, husband and father, was killed while in the employ of the coal company.

Information from FamilySearch.org

Bartolomeo Cibrario was born January 1, 1903 in Usseglio, Torino, Italy. He died in the Castle Gate mine explosion on March 8, 1924 and is buried in the Mountain View cemetery in Helper, Carbon, Utah.

Clark, George Albert
Copied from FamilySearch.org

Born 10 Oct 1882 in Coalville, Summit, Utah, United States Death 1 May 1900 in Coalville, Summit, Utah, United States (Scofield Mining Disaster)

Clark, Samuel Walter Jr.
Excerpts from History of the Scofield Mine Disaster
By James W. Dilley

Coalville's eleven dead were brought from Scofield on a special train, which reached here at eleven o'clock last night. The bodies were carried to the Stake Tabernacle. Forty-three of the relatives accompanied the dead. Salt Lake people contributed a carload of flowers. Undertaker T. L. Allen met the train at Salt Lake and took charge of the bodies. The funeral was held today, the Stake Tabernacle being decorated with flowers and appropriately draped. There was a large attendance of people from adjoining towns of Wyoming. The Tabernacle was filled to overflowing.

These are the names, ages, etc., of the deceased: . Three brothers, as follows: Walter Clark, killed while trying to rescue his brothers, born in Utah, age 24, leaves a wife and one child; William Clark, born in Utah, age 26: George, born in Utah, age 16.

Clark, William Henry
http://www.msha.gov/DISASTER/Scofield/scofield5.asp
paragraph from the Mining Disasters- article

Will Clark, a young miner who had been working outside at the time of the explosion, entered the mine with the first rescue party. Disregarding warnings of more experienced miners, Clark raced ahead alone to find his father and brother who were in the mine, but ran right into the lingering afterdamp (a mixture of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and other gases that forms after a mine fire or explosion and is irrespirable) and died before help could reach him.

Clark, William Jr.

Research note: Not sure if the "young Will Clark" mentioned in the MSHA record is this Will Clark or the other William Clark or not, I added this story to the youngest - then the rest will be up to the reader to decide.

Clavora, Antonio
Ogden Standard Examiner, Mon. Sept. 23, 1929
MINER MEETS DEATH

PRICE - Sept. 23, Antonia Clavora, a miner employed at the National mine in Gordon Creek, was killed Saturday evening when a fall of coal fractured his skull. He died about 20 minutes later. Mr. Clavora was single and had been employed at the mines of that camp for about four years. He was born in Italy.

Coffey, Samuel
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1915-1916 - page 26

Sam Coffey, American, miner, age 27, single, was instantly killed on May 24th, 1915, in No. 15 pillar, second right Fowler entry.

Deceased, in company with John Kreston and Lauren Cameron, was working in the above pillar when during the night of May 23rd considerable top coal had caved in their working place. On the morning of the 24th they started to load up the fallen top coal and to re-timber as they advanced. Whenever room was made by loading the coal to put up a timber they did so, examining the roof carefully as they advanced. Movement of the roof took place something similar to a bounce and considerable cap rock fell, covering both Kreston and Coffey. Kreston was removed uninjured, but Coffey was dead.

Coleman, Jack Alonzo
Ogden Standard Examiner Tuesday September 9, 1947
Mine Mishap Is Fatal

COLUMBIA, Utah Sept. 9 - Jack Coleman, 25, a coal miner, was killed Monday when struck on the head by a piece of coal during drilling operations in the Columbia Steel Co., mine, Miner Superintendent E. S. O'Connor reported. The mine was closed today to allow federal inspectors and company officials to inspect the accident scene.

Collias, George
Industrial Commission 1922-1924 page 57

United States Fuel Company, Hiawatha, Utah - George Collias, Greek, age 31 single. At the time of the accident he was riding in the first car of a trip composed of 16 empty mine cars, when at a point near a curve, the car in which he was riding, together with the next two cars, jumped the track to the right. He jumped to the left, but held onto the side of the car. ...cont. on page 58 but not copied)

Research note: Died at the Hiawatha mine at the age of 32 on September 6, 1924. Death certificate states accidental traumatism on coal mine tramway. The Sunnyside Wars book states his name as Kolmpistardas, (also known as Moistardas, Collias, Koais, and Colleas.)

Collins, Abner
Salt Lake Tribune, Monday Dec. 13, 1943
Two Miners Succumb To Injuries

PRICE - One coal miner died in Price Sunday and another Saturday from injuries suffered in two accidents.

Dead are: William Alonzo Warren, 65, Sunnyside, and Abner Collins, 37, Dragerton.

Mr. Warren was injured Saturday when struck by a falling cap rock in the Utah Fuel company mine. He had just entered a tunnel to being timbering.

Taken to a Price hospital, he died Sunday at 4:45 a.m.

Mr. Warren was born in Texas, February 18, 1878. He had been employed by the Utah Fuel company for 18 months.

Survivors include the widow, Mrs. Fannie Lee Warren, and two sons, Sergeant Jay T. Warren, United States army and Gam W. Warren, Royal.

Working as a nipper on a rotary coal dump at the Geneva mine, Mr. Collins was crushed to death Saturday when he slipped, falling into the operating dump. A nipper hooks cars together on coal trains.

Mr. Collins had been employed about a year by the Geneva mine.

He was born November 28, 1906, in Heavner, Okla., son of Philen and Sibble Collins.

Survivors include the widow; Mrs. Zimmie Collins; one son and two daughters, Jerald Dean and Louise Ford Collins, Dragerton, and Marian E. Collins, Oklahoma and a stepson, Leonard Odell Robertson, Price.

Ogden Standard Examiner, Monday Dec 13, 1943
Mishaps Claim Two Coal Miners

PRICE - Dec. 13 - Two coal miners died over the weekend as result of separate mine accidents.

William Alonzo Warren, 65, of Sunnyside, Utah, was struck Saturday by falling cap rock at the Utah Fuel Co. mine. He died Sunday at a Price hospital.

Abner Collins, 37, of Dragerton, Utah, was crushed to death Saturday when he fell into an operating dump at the Geneva mine.


Salt Lake Telegram, 1943-12-13 Dragerton Man Killed in Mine Accident

PRICE- The body of Abner Collins, 37, Dragerton, who was killed in a mine accident Saturday, will be taken to Oklahoma for funeral services and burial, it was learned Monday.

Mr. Collins was working as a nipper on a rotary coal dump at the Geneva mine when he slipped, falling into the operating dump, where he was crushed to death. A nipper hooks cars together on coal trains. He had been employed about a year by the Geneva mine.

He was born November 26, 1906, in Heavener, Okla., son of Philen and Sibble Collins. Survivors include the widow, Mrs. Zimmie Collins; one son and two daughters, Jerald Dean and Louise Ford Collins, Dragerton, and Marian E. Collins, Oklahoma, and a stepson, Leonard O’dell Robertson, Price.

Colzani, Joseph
Ogden Standard Examiner, Wed. Nov 10, 1943
Utah Miner Killed by Ore Car

LATUDA, Nov. 10 - Joseph Colzani of Helper was killed Tuesday while he was leaving the Liberty Fuel Co. mine with a load of ore.

He was found lying under the car in a tunnel, indicating it had run over him, officials said.

Come, Frank (Coma)
News Advocate July 12, 1917
MAN KILLED WITH SHOVEL BY AVASTINA

Narrowly escaping a charge of murdering Jim Bianchi because his victim got well after doctors had declared it almost impossible and freed because no one would prosecute him, John Avastina of Storrs was brought back to the county jail yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Kilfoyle on a charge of murdering Frank Coma in the mine at Storrs yesterday morning.

Three weeks ago, Avastina struck Jim Bianchi over the head with a jack bar as the latter was assaulting his (Bianchi's) wife. Avastina made for the hills at once and the injured man was taken to a hospital at Provo where it was said there was little hope for recovery. He was soon able to be back home and after hiding two weeks, Avastina gave himself up to Sheriff Collingham. No one would file a complaint or assist the officers in the prosecution so he was turned loose and went back to work in the mine.

Avastina asked that Coma be made his working mate although the two men were strangers. About the middle of the forenoon, a boy in the mine saw Avastina strike Coma with his shovel. He went to report the matter and when others arrived where the two men had been working, Coma's body was buried in the coal. The shovel of Avastina was battered and broken and examination proved that the head of Coma was beaten to a jelly. Avastina was placed under arrest and immediately brought to Price. He says little about the affair except that he acted in self-defense.

The slayer has seemed in deadly fear of everybody since he returned from hiding. He was taken before Justice W. W. Clyde Monday evening and fined $40 for his assault on Bianchi. He is but 23 and has always borne an excellent reputation at Storrs. It is deemed probable by those who have investigated the case that in his fear he misconstrued some act or word of Coma's and acted without thought.

Ogden Standard - July 13, 1917
MINER IS ACCUSED OF KILLING PARTNER

PRICE, July 12 - Frank Coma, an Italian, was killed at the mine at Storrs yesterday by John Avastina, his working partner. Only the fact that the blow with a shovel was seen by a driver boy several yards away allowed the deed to become known quickly, for Avastina buried the body in coal and was preparing to get away.

No motive is known, but the slayer claims self-defense in a quarrel.

Avastina was released only Monday, after spending five days in jail waiting for someone to prosecute him for an assault on Jim Bianchi three weeks ago. Bianchi was said to have been assaulting his wife and her screams attracted Avastina, who struck the husband over the head with a jack bar. He was rushed to Provo to a hospital where it was said he would not live.

News Advocate August 2, 1917
AVASTINA IS INSANE

Sheriff George Collingham took John Avastina to the mental hospital at Provo yesterday, it being decided that his mind was too far gone to expect him to be able to stand trial on a murder charge. He killed a fellow workman in the mine at Storrs with a shovel recently, shortly after he had fractured the skull of another man in a quarrel. He lost his mind after committing the two crimes although the battered condition of his shovel and his victim indicate an insane frenzy at that time.

News Advocate September 29, 1921
New Angle Found To Prolonged Como Case

As guardian of the three minor children of Frank Como, killed in 1917 while working in the Spring Canyon Coal company's mine at Storrs, Fortunato S. Anselmo has filed petition before the industrial commission of Utah for an award under the workmen's compensation law. The widow, Marie Como, won an award some time ago from the Industrial commission, but the supreme court reversed the case, and at the same time commenced on the action of the state insurance fund in waiving its right to plead the statute of limitations. However, that statute, it is held, will not be operative as against the minors.

Como is supposed to have been killed by John Avastino while the latter was in a fit of insanity. The assailant is now in the state mental hospital, where the superintendent declares his case is hopeless. However, it is understood that Mr. Anselmo will simply recite the fact that the workman was found dead in his place of employment, and that there were no witnesses to his death, but that lacerations indicate that it was due to accident. With such a record, it may devolve on the company to show that the death was not due to an accident arising out of and in the course of employment.

Conniff, Pat
Sun Advocate June 10, 1976
Crushed by truck

Pat Conniff, 31, a Price resident, was killed about noon Tuesday when a coal truck operated by Marasco Bros. Trucking backed over him at the Braztah coal preparation plant in Hard Scrabble canyon.

According to Paul Aiman, Braztah spokesman, the accident is under investigation by the Utah Highway Patrol and other governmental agencies.

Conniff was pronounced dead on arrival at Carbon Hospital.

Conrado, Joseph Eugene
Salt Lake Tribune Tuesday April 24, 1951
Runaway Cars Kill 1, Hurt 1 at Coal Mine

SUNNYSIDE - One man was killed instantly and another critically injured in the smashup of a run-away seven-car coal train at the Kaiser No. 2 mine here Monday at 2 p.m.

Killed was Joseph Eugene Conrado, 30, Sunnydale, .Carbon County. He suffered a fractured skull.

In critical condition at Dragerton hospital Monday night was James Ward, 26, Cleveland, who suffered a depressed skull fracture, according to hospital attendants.

Deputy Frank Ellis, Carbon county investigating officer, said there were no witnesses to the mishap.

He said a seven-car mine "trip" loaded with 42 tons of coal, was being operated by the two men when the train suddenly stopped its forward motion as it was coming out of the mine, and rolled backward at terrific speed.

Mine workers found the train smashed into a pile of rubble at the bottom of the mine and found Mr. Ward beside the wreckage. He was unconscious.

Mr. Conrado's body was found a short time later when wrecking crews began cleaning up the debris, said Mr. Ellis.

Company officials said an investigation into the accident will be conducted Tuesday at 8 a.m. by the company.

Cooper, Edward L.
Article:

On January 4, 1984, about 10:05 a.m. an underground powered haulage accident occurred in the 8 Left headgate section of Star Point No. 2 mine. The accident caused fatal crushing injuries to Edward Cooper, shuttle car operator. Cooper was 30 years old and had 5 years 3 months mining experience. The accident occurred when Cooper extended the upper portion of his body between the protective cab and sideboard of the conveyor boom. Cooper inadvertently active the boom hydraulic control lever, raising the conveyor boom, crushing him between the protective cab and conveyor boom sideboard.

Corsetti, Antonio
Sun Advocate - Thursday, June 10, 1937
First Latuda Mine Mishap in 6 years kills one, hurts 2
Antonio Corsetti Meets Death Tuesday Afternoon When Hit by Rock Fall

One man was killed and two men were injured in the Liberty Fuel company's mine at Latuda Tuesday afternoon by a fall of rock which marred one of the most remarkable mine safety records in the history of Carbon county's coal industry.

Fatally injured was Antonio Corsetti, about 45, who was believed to have been instantly killed. He was crushed beneath the rock, receiving a broken neck, crushed chest and pelvis and severe lacerations.

The injured were John Krissman and Val Turri, who suffered from shock and severe bruises.

Dr. I. K. Cummings of Standardville, who treated Krissman and Turri, reported that in view of the nature of the accident it is possible the two men also received minor fractures and internal injuries.

The accident was the first to occur in the mine since 1931. During the six year period since the last mishap the company was often cited for its safety accomplishments.

Corsetti is survived by four children who lived with their father on a farm in Standardville. Also surviving are a brother in Pennsylvania and a sister in Italy.

Funeral arrangements will be under the direction of the Flynn Funeral home.

Utah Industrial Commission 1938 - page 79

Virginia Corsetti, daughter of Antonio Corsetti, deceased, et al., vs. Liberty Fuel company, and the State Insurance Fund.

On June 8, 1937, Antonio Corsetti was employed as a coal miner. A rock fell from the roof of the mine, causing injuries.

Cotsolakis (Kosalakis), Mike
1912 Biennial Mine Report - page 108

Mike Kosalakis, a Greek miner, single, aged 37 years, was killed on the man trip at motor parting, No. 2 mine, Sunnyside, April 20th. Kosalakis came onto the parting, as is customary, to take the man trip at quitting time. He got into the mine car with four other men and sat down on the side of the car nearest the trolley wire. After sitting for a few minutes, he rose up and leaned over the side of the car. His head came in contact with the trolley wire, the contact causing him to stagger, and he fell with his face against the trolley wire the second time, over which effects he died.

Couchorenakis, Crolleos (Kotsernakis, Eraklis)
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1907-1910 - page 86-87

Eraklis Kotsernakis, aged 26 years, a native of Cretan, single, employed as a miner at Castle Gate, No. 2 mine, met his death on the 28th day of October, 1910. Kotsernakis was killed at the head of the first raise, No. 2 mine, at 9:20 a.m. by a fall of rock from the roof, from what is known as a pot hole. He and a partner had just finished shoveling back coal from the face, when the deceased sat down on the coal to wait for an empty car. While sitting there, the rock fell, crushing his skull. The rock measured 10 feet 9 inches by 7 feet 4 inches and 21 inches thick in the center, running to a feather edge on three sides and a 4-inch thickness on the other side. Deceased and partner had not examined the roof that morning, as they thought it looked all right. The rock that fell was just six feet from face. Both were experienced miners, but these pot hole rocks do not give warning before falling.

Cowley, William Altez
News Advocate, Feb. 27, 1930
ROCK FALL FATAL TO CARBON MINER - William Altez Cowley, Native of Cleveland Killed In Consumers Mine.

Wm. "Ted" Cowley of Cleveland was killed Tuesday afternoon in the Blue Blaze Coal mine at Consumers when crushed beneath a fall of top rock. Cowley was working on a loader and in the act of pushing it forward came directly under the cave-in. Examination by Dr. William Merrell revealed that he had received a fractured skull, a broken right leg and a badly crushed shoulder. He died five minutes after being injured.

William Altez Cowley was born in Cleveland, Utah, June 12, 1902, the son of J. M. and Angeline Cowley. Cleveland has been his home ever since that time. He is survived by his parents; three sisters, Mrs. Lucille White and Mrs. Mattie Anderson of Cleveland and Mrs. Udella Huntsman of Ogden and four brothers, Emory, Milton and Dean of Cleveland and Ben of Huntington.

Cox, Archibald Lyman
Salt Lake Tribune, Wed. July 29, 1942
Mishap Costs Utah Coal Miner's Life

STANDARDVILLE - Archibald Lyman Cox, 34, died Tuesday at 1 a.m. in a Standardville hospital of injuries suffered in an accident Monday afternoon in the Standard coal mine here.

Mr. Cox suffered leg fractures and a crushed body when he was run over by an ore train in the mine. F. A. Dobbs, mine foreman, said the victim was a motorman and was working alone when the accident occurred.

He apparently fell off the motor of the train of cars while descending an incline near the surface of the mine. Mr. Dobbs explained. Shortly after the accident, physicians amputated one of Mr. Cox's legs in an effort to save his life.

He was born in Fairview November 27, 1907, a son of Mal and Emeline Anderson Cox.

Surviving are his parents; his widow, Mrs. Stella Constance Cox; a daughter, Mildred Cox, a son, John Cox; four brothers, Milvin Cox of Salt Lake City, Ray Cox of Los Angeles, Ron Cox of Ely, Nev., and Alvin Cox of Standardville, and a sister, Mrs. Alice Simmons of Ely.

Funeral services will be conducted Saturday at 10 a.m. in the Standardville LDS ward chapel. Burial will be in the Fairview cemetery under direction of Mitchell mortuary of Price.

Cox, Edward Beattie
Ogden Standard Examiner Mon. Mar. 10, 1924
HAS 5 RELATIVES IN MINE DISASTER

CASTLE GATE March 10 - Five close relatives of L. T. Davis, manager of the Wasatch store here, are entombed in the Utah Fuel company Mine No. 2. They are John Davis, his brother; Thomas Reese and Edward Cox, his uncles; David Evans, his cousin and Robert Crow, his brother-in-law.

Davis' father was killed in a cave-in in mine No. 1 twelve years ago. Many of his relatives on his father's side were also killed in mine disasters, it is said.

Crawford, David Swan
Ogden Standard Examiner Nov. 11, 1948
Ore Cars Crush Mine Official

Columbia, Utah - Nov. 11 - The assistant mine foreman at Geneva Steel Co.'s Columbia mine was killed yesterday when struck by a trip of cars inside the mine.

He was 49 year old David S. Crawford.

Company officials said he was crushed between the trip of cars coming down a 12 per cent grade and a stationary car.

Salt Lake Tribune Nov. 11, 1948
Columbia Mine Mishap Kills Foreman, 49

COLUMBIA, Carbon County, Nov. 10 - David S. Crawford, 49, assistant mine foreman at Geneva Steel Co. Columbia mine, was killed Wednesday at 2:20 pm when struck by a trip of cars inside the mine.

Company officials said Mr. Crawford was crushed between the trip of cars coming down a 12% slope and a stationary car. The accident occurred about one and one-half miles inside the mine.

Officials said late Wednesday that an investigation started immediately after the mishap will be continued Thursday.

Mr. Crawford was born Oct. 22, 1899, in Almy, Wyo., and has been employed by the mine since 1925.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Crawford, and three sons, David 17; Knute, 15, and Patrick Crawford, 6.

Cresto, Frank
Biennial Report of the State Coal Mine inspector

On this date Fran Cresto was instantly killed in the Castle Gate mine.

At the time of the accident Cresto was in the act of loading a car of coal, when a rock fell from the roof and struck him on the head, killing him instantly.

Deseret News 1900-02-23
Fatal Mine Accident -- Frank Cresto Killed by Falling Rock

Price, Carbon Co., Feb 22 - an accident happened yesterday at the Castle Gate mine, by which Frank Cresto, an Italian, lost his life. Cresto was at work in his room loading a car, when a large piece of rock, weighing about a ton, fell on him and killed him instantly. An inquest was held last evening and the verdict was "Accidental death.' Through not having his working place properly timbered. Cresto will be buried tomorrow, Friday, and it is said the mine will be idle so as to give the miners a chance to attend the funeral.

Crocco, Stanley
The Salt Lake Tribune Wed. Dec. 15, 1948
Mine Accident Takes Life of Utahn, 43

KENILWORTH, Carbon County - Dec. 14 - A falling mine timber struck and fatally injured a section foreman in the Independent Coke and Coal Co. mine here Tuesday at 3:20 p.m.

Stanley Crocco, 43, was working underground with a group of men removing timbers when he was struck on the head by a falling timber. Artificial respiration was given in the mine and he was removed to Kenilworth hospital, where he died at 5 p.m.

Mr. Crocco had been employed at the mine for more than 20 years.

He was born in Italy Dec. 20, 1904. Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Clara Crocco; two sons and a daughter: Louis, Stanley and Rosemarie Crocco, Kenilworth, and a brother, Pete Crocco, Kenilworth.

Mitchell funeral home, Price, will announce funeral arrangements.

The Salt Lake Tribune, Sat. Dec. 18, 1948
Miner's Rites Slated Today

PRICE Dec. 17 - Requiem mass for Stanley Crocco, 44, Kenilworth miner, will be celebrated Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at St. Anthony Catholic church in Helper.

Mr. Crocco was fatally injured by a falling timber while at work in Independent Coal and Coke Co. mine at Kenilworth Tuesday.

Rosary was recited Friday evening at Mitchell funeral home in Price. Burial will be in Price City cemetery.

Mr. Crocco was born at Cosenza, Italy, Oct. 20, 1904, a son of Louis and Rose Creco Crocco. He had been an employe of the Independent Coke and Coal Co. since shortly after his arrival in the United States 26 years ago. He was a section foreman.

Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Clara Crocco; a daughter and two sons, Rose Marie, Louis and Stanley Crocco, Jr., Kenilworth; a brother and three sisters, Pete Crocco, Kenilworth; Mrs. Ellen Crocco, Mrs. Julia Crenzia and Mrs. Nanette Lucencle, Italy, and his parents, Italy.

Crosby, William
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1903-1904 page 130

Wm. Crosby, a trapper, was killed in the Sunnyside Mine, No. 2. Crosby fell in front of a trip, being crushed about the abdomen.

Cody of Coroner's Verdict: An inquest having been held at Sunnyside, in Sunnyside Precinct, Carbon County, State of Utah, on this second day of January, 1904, before William Hill, Justice of the Peace, in Sunnyside Precinct, in said County, upon the body of William Crosby, there lying dead, by the Jurors whose names are hereunto subscribed.

The said Jurors upon their oath do say, that William Crosby came to his death according to the evidence through accident, and though no fault of any party or parties, being away from his line of duty at the head of the trip.

newspaper article

Sunnyside, Utah, January 2 - William Crosby, who was employed by the coal company a few weeks ago, was accidentally killed in Mine No. 2 today. Crosby was only 11 years of age and was run over by a trip of loaded coal cars. He received injuries from he died as soon as he reached the local hospital. He was employed since the strike went into effect.

Crow, Robert
Ogden Standard Examiner Mon. Mar. 10, 1924
HAS 5 RELATIVES IN MINE DISASTER

CASTLE GATE March 10 - Five close relatives of L. T. Davis, manager of the Wasatch store here, are entombed in the Utah Fuel company Mine No. 2. They are John Davis, his brother; Thomas Reese and Edward Cox, his uncles; David Evans, his cousin and Robert Crow, his brother-in-law.

Davis' father was killed in a cave-in in mine No. 1 twelve years ago. Many of his relatives on his father's side were also killed in mine disasters, it is said.

Cruchi, Frank
Biennial Report

Frank Chruchi, Italian miner, aged 26 years, married, no children, died suddenly in the return air-way of the Cameron Coal Mine on November 3, 1914.

Mr. Cruchi and his partner, Chas. Moltini, after finishing their shift, were walking up the return air-way slope which is also the manway, and has a pitch of approximately 30 per cent and is 800 feet in length. Moltini was in the lead about 10 feet and when about half-way up the slope he heard Cruchi stumble and call to him. As Moltini stopped and turned he saw Cruchi fall forward with his right hand over a power cable. Moltini caught him by the shoulder to support him, but felt a shock. He then took hold of Cruchi's loose clothing and pulled him from the wire into the center of the manway, after which he called to some men below for help, when they tried artificial respiration, but could not revive him. The body was then taken to the surface and was examined, but no visible marks or burns were found on him. It is probably that a current of electricity passed through his body.

Cruz, Frank
Salt Lake Tribune Thursday, Dec. 8, 1949

Frank Cruz - Funeral services for Frank Cruz, 36, Price, will be held in the Mitchell funeral home Saturday at 2 p.m. under the direction of Rev. Carl Measell.

Mr. Cruz died at 12:35 Wednesday morning in a Kenilworth hospital as the result of severe injuries received when he fell off a ladder in the Kenilworth mine at 10 p.m. Tuesday night.

He was born at Mora, N. M. March 30, 1913, a son of Bonefacio and Efejenra Salazar Cruz.

He had been an employe of the mine for one year and before that had worked as a carpenter helper and miner in other mines. He lived with his family at 7th East and 1st North, Price.

Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Margery Cruz; six sons, Ray, Daniel, Vonny, Robert, David, and Richard Cruz, all of Price; and one daughter, Rebecca Cruz, Price; his mother, Mrs. Efejenra Montoya, Cleveland, N. M.; four sisters, Mrs. Annie Medina and Mrs. Corley Vigil, Price; Mrs. Madelina Montoya and Mrs. Cordillia Sandoval, Cleveland, N. M.; two half-brothers, Alex Montoya, Bingham, and Cereseniso Montoya, Wyoming.Burial will be in the Price City Cemetery.

Cuburu, Charles Jean
Obituary

Price - Charles J. "Chuck" Cuburu, 57, died Jan. 19, 1979 as the result of injuries received in a snow avalanche while at work at Braztah Corp. near Helper, Carbon County.

Born Aug. 15, 1921, Price, Carbon County, to Jean and Mary Bonomo Cuburu. Married Barbara Lamph Aug. 14, 1948, Price. Member Catholic Church. Graduated from Notre Dame High School. Served with the U.S. Army in Europe during WW II. Elected Carbon County School Board member where he served as president and vice president. Past president Carbon High School Band and Parents Association. Past vice president, chairman of Choir Parents Association. Past president Blue Wells swim team. Volunteer fireman for Price City for 15 years. Member Price Elks Lodge No. 1550, Price Veterans of Foreign Wars, and Price Post American Legion. Active in many other social, civic and fraternal activities.

Survivors: widow; daughter, Michele, both Price; mother, Mary B. Jones; sister, Mrs. Armanond (Katherine) Catarell, both Salt Lake City; and Mrs. Russell (Margaret) Miller, Denver, Colo.

Catholic chapel services will be Tuesday 1 p.m. at the Mitchell Funeral Chapel, where Holy Rosary will be recited Monday 7 p.m. Friends may call Mitchell Funeral Chapel Sunday and Monday and Tuesday prior to services. Burial, Price City Cemetery. In lieu of flowers family suggests contributions be made to Charles Cuburu Memorial Band Scholarship Fund, College of Eastern Utah, Price.

Cullum, Ernest Henry
SL Telegram 1944-02-17
Funeral Rites Set for Victims of Mine Accident

HIAWATHA - Funeral services for Ernest H. Cullum, 48, Emery county coal miner, who died as a result of a cave-in at the Hiawatha mine Monday, will be conducted at 1 p. m. Sunday in the Lawrence L D S ward chapel, with Bishop Thomas in charge. Burial will be in the Lawrence cemetery.

Mr. Cullum was born at Grover August 30, 1895, a son of W. H. and Martha Cullum. He had worked at the mine 13 months.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Edna Cullum; a daughter, Peggy Cullum of Lawrence; two sons, Carrol Cullum of Hiawatha, and Martin Henry Cullum of Huntington.

Friends may call at the Mitchell Funeral home in Price until time of the funeral.

Salt Lake Tribune Wednesday Feb. 16, 1944
Carbon Mine Accidents Claim Two

PRICE - Two Carbon county miners were killed in separate mine accidents Monday. One worker was crushed under a top coal slide and the second died of injuries received when a loaded car, rolling down the tracks, struck him in the back.

Ernest H. Cullum, 48, Lawrence, Emery County, died Monday evening at a Price hospital of a broken back and internal injuries suffered Monday noon while working in the United States Fuel company mine at Hiawatha when a fall of top coal crushed him. Several other workers were nearby but none were injured.

Mr. Cullum was born at Grover, August 30, 1895, a son of W. H. and Martha Cullum. He had worked at the mine 13 months.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Edna Cullum, and a daughter, Peggy Cullum of Lawrence; two sons, Carrol Cullum of Hiawatha and Martin Henry Cullum of Huntington.

Funeral services are tentatively scheduled for Sunday in the Lawrence L D S ward chapel. Burial will be in Lawrence cemetery under direction of the Mitchell funeral home.

Walter Hull, 58, died in a Price hospital Monday evening. He was fatally injured Monday at the Utah Fuel Company mine, while working as a parting or switch tender underground. Unknown to him, the switch releasing cars had already been thrown. He threw the switch again, and began walking down a track. The released car struck him from the rear, breaking his legs and causing internal injuries. He had worked at the mine since 1929.

Mr. Hull was born at Antioch, W. Va. June 18, 1885. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Bertha Hull, Castlegate; a stepson Howard Thomas of Richmond, Cal., and a stepdaughter, Mrs. Wanda Green of Salt Lake City. Funeral services are pending word from Mr. Thomas in California.

Cunningham, James
Biennial report of the state Coal mine Inspector

On my fifth visit of inspection on Oct. 5th, 1901. On Oct. 4th I received a message from the mine superintendent, stating that two men had been killed in No. 1 mine on the night of Oct. 3rd. Their names were Edward Hughes and James Cunningham. I arrived at the mine on Oct. 5th as this was the first train I could get there on. I at once proceeded to examine the part of the mine in which the accident occurred and found it to be in no way a dangerous place. There had been a shot fired in the roof which did not bring all the loose rock down. Hughes and Cunningham with three other men had gone back after the shot had been fired and sounded the roof with a pick, thinking it was safe. Hughes and Cunningham proceeded to load a car of rock directly under the place where the shot had been fired, while thus engaged a portion of the rock fell, striking the two men and killing them instantly. The rock which fell on these men, as I found it, was thick in the center and thin on the edges. In my opinion the men did sound the rock, they sounded it in the thick part, which would make it sound quite solid, at the same time the rock may have been loose, made so by the shot they had just fired. Twenty minutes after the shot had been fired the rock fell.

Deseret News 1901-10-04
Two Men Instantly Killed

Tragic Event at Sunnyside - J. Cunningham and E. Hughes the victims

Sunnyside, Oct 4 - James Cunningham, of Rock Springs, Wyoming, and Edward Hughes, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, were instantly killed in No. 1 mine last night by a fall of rock.

Salt Lake Herald, 5 Oct 1901 pg. 5
Two Miners killed
Life Crushed Out of Men by Huge Piece of Rock

Sunnyside, Oct. 4, As the result of being caught under a mass of rock that caved from the roof of a tunnel in mine No. 1 of the Utah Fuel company here last night, two miners lost their lives. They were James Cunningham and Edward Hughes.

The accident occurred shortly after midnight. The miners belonged to the class known as rockmen. It was their duty to clear away the rock so that the coal could be more readily mined. In company with several other employees, Hughes and Cunningham had fired a shot in the center of the tunnel roof.

It broke down about two carloads of rock and, after picking off the hanging fragments that looked dangerous, the work of loading the cars was begun. Suddenly, without a moment's warning a great mass of stone that had been loosened by the shot fell from the roof of the tunnel.

Cunningham and Hughes were directly under it and their lives were instantly crushed out. The bodies were recovered shortly after the accident and taken to the homes of the dead men. Superintendent J. R. Sharp wired State Coal Mine Inspector Gomer M. Thomas about the fatality and received word that the inspector would come to Sunnyside at once.

Salt Lake Herald, 6 Oct 1901
Sunnyside Tragedy
Wife of a Victim Gives Account of the Accident

The body of James Cunningham, who was killed by an explosion in no. 1 coal mine at Sunnyside early Thursday morning, together with Edward Hughes, was brought to Salt Lake City yesterday to be embalmed preparatory to removal to Rock Springs for burial. Mrs. Cunningham and her 12-year-old son accompanied the remains, stopping over night at the Kenyon.

"It was a terrible blow." Said Mrs. Cunningham last night. My husband and his partner, Hughes, had set a blast. Upon its failure to explode they went to the spot to investigate. Without warning the explosion followed, the concussion and falling stone killing both. We have always lived at Rock Springs and we are going there to conduct the funeral."

Services were held at Sunnyside yesterday for both victims and Hughes was laid to rest. He was from Wales and so far as could be found, had no immediate relatives. Cunningham's funeral will occur Monday.

Deseret News 1901-10-07 page 7
Fatality in coal mine
Edward Hughes and James Cunningham killed by falling rock.

Sunnyside, Carbon, Co., Oct 4 - James Cunningham, formerly of Rock Springs, Wyo., and Edward Hughes of Scranton, Penn., were instantly killed last night in No. 1 mine, while taking down rock. They had fired one shot and went back to load up the rock. One of the men sounded the roof and said it was all right so the others commenced to load the car, when the rock fell, killing the two men, and Archie Brown narrowly escaped death.

Cunningham leaves a wife and one child. Hughes is said to be married, but it is not known where his wife lives. Cunningham's body will be shipped to Rock Springs if possible. Both mines are idle today.

Later - James Laverty and Geo. Goldie, both stated that they examined the roof prior to loading the car, and pronounced it safe.

Cunningham, John
1914 Biennial Mine Report - page 118

John Cunningham, American, age 21, single, employed as machine runner's helper, was injured in the Kenilworth Seam, Kenilworth, January 16, 1914, from the results of which he died at 7 p.m. the same evening.

Peter Nesbit, the machine runner, with Cunningham as helper, had taken their machine (a Sullivan Shortwall) to the main heading, preparatory to mining the same. They had set their jacks and were preparing to run the machine to the face for the sumping cut. Nesbit was stooping down with his hand on the controller (the controller being on the third contact, the machine was moving towards the face) when it is presumed that Cunningham noticed the main jack move, and fearing that it might possibly fall on Nesbit, stepped forward to steady it with his hand. In stepping forward he got too close to the revolving machine picks, which caught his loose overalls, pulling his right foot and leg into the machine up to his thigh, tearing the flesh and muscles from the leg and thigh so that it was necessary to amputate same. During this operation he died.

Cunningham, John, Jr.
Report of the Coal Mine Inspector 1913-1914 - page 24

John Cunningham, Jr., American, employed as driver, single, aged 24 years, was injured on the main north entry, Storrs Mine, Spring Canyon, October 10th, 1913, from which injuries he died the same day.

Cunningham had just come out of the third west on to the main north entry, when a train of cars, attached to the fifteen ton motor, came down grade out of control of the motor man, the leading cars jumping the track opposite to where Cunningham was standing. The entry was twenty-one feet wide at this point, but the loaded cars crushed him against the rib, causing injuries from which he died.

Cunningham, John S.
The Sun August 17, 1917
STORRS MINER SUCCUMBS

John S. Cunningham, one of the men who was injured by an explosion at Storrs a few days ago, while in the employ of the Spring Canyon Coal company, died at a hospital at Provo on Thursday of last week. He was 65 years old, and is survived by a wife and seven children at Scofield. The body was sent there for burial. G. H. Mower, another man who was injured in company with Cunningham, though still in the hospital at Provo, is improving. The dead man was one of the old residents of Carbon county and also one of its most respected and good citizens.

Cunningham, Michael

Report of Industrial Commission
Page 84 - Claim No. 954 - Decision rendered January 14, 1925

James Cunningham, father of and claimant as dependent of Michael Cunningham, deceased, vs. Spring Canyon Coal Company.

On December 28, 1923, the Industrial Commission of Utah received communication from James Cunningham who resides at Fofani, Kilcoo P. O., County, ..land, making application for compensation for the death of his son Michael Cunningham while in the employ of the Spring Canyon Coal Company. Applicant alleged that he was an invalid and unable to move without the assistance of his daughter, Mary Ellen, and the two of them claimed dependency on decedent for their maintenance and support.

After investigation by the commission and the depositions of applicant, the Commission finds that on October 3, 1923, Michael Cunningham, of Storrs, Utah;, was injured by reason of an accident arising in the course of his employment while regularly employed by the Spring Canyon Coal Company; that the result of said injuries he died at the Holy Cross Hospital on October 21, 1923. At the time of fatal injury, decedent was paid a wage of $50.00 per week, working six days per week. Defendants paid the sum of $237.00 for the burial of decedent and also paid the hospital and medical expense according to law. Applicant did not rely on contributions made to him by his son for his maintenance and support; that decedent did not regularly contribute to the maintenance and support of his father. That other than James Cunningham, no other person or persons have made application before the Industrial Commission of Utah for compensation for the death of Michael Cunningham.

Ordered that claim of James Cunningham, for compensation be denied. That defendant's pay into the State Treasury of the State of Utah, the sum of $990.17, representing 20 per cent of $4950.87 for the death of Michael Cunningham, as provided in Section 3140 of the State Industrial Act.

Research note: Age 35 died 21 Oct 1923 due to embolism, fractured pelvis in a coal mine accident.

Curtis, Edward Lester (Lester E.)
Milford News, 1930-03-21
MINE TOLL TAKES WOMAN'S THREE SONS

Among the scores of women and children who waited anxiously at the mine portal for news of their loved ones was Mrs. Ella Turner, 55. Three of the five victims of the Peerless mine explosion were her sons a fourth, a son-in-law.

William Curtis is a son by previous marriage, while Clement and Danny Turner were sons by second marriage. Lester Curtis married one of Mrs. Turner's daughters.

Patiently the anxious woman waited for the sight of her boys.

"They've just taken out one of the boys and he is all right, Mrs. Turner," someone told the woman and her face brightened in the dusk that settled around picturesque Castle Gate Rock.

A few minutes later word came that her three sons and son-in-law were victims. The aged woman collapsed and the cries of the four wives were heard above the crowd.

Nine grandchildren, a bereaved daughter and three grief - stricken daughter-in-laws were all that she had to remind her, as she lay prostrate at her home, of the happier days when her life and family were young. - Price Sun

Curtis, Francis Lionel
Ogden Standard Examiner, Wed., January 7, 1953
Spring Canyon Miner Killed

PRICE - Falling rock fatally injured Miner Francis L. Curtis, 26, at the Spring Canyon coal mine in Spring Canyon, Utah, yesterday.

Curtis, a resident of Spring Canyon, was working as a timberman when a piece of rock fell and struck him in the head.

It was the first mining fatality of 1953 in Carbon County.

Curtis, William Eliel
Milford News, 1930-03-21
MINE TOLL TAKES WOMAN'S THREE SONS

Among the scores of women and children who waited anxiously at the mine portal for news of their loved ones was Mrs. Ella Turner, 55. Three of the five victims of the Peerless mine explosion were her sons a fourth, a son-in-law.

William Curtis is a son by previous marriage, while Clement and Danny Turner were sons by second marriage. Lester Curtis married one of Mrs. Turner's daughters.

Patiently the anxious woman waited for the sight of her boys.

"They've just taken out one of the boys and he is all right, Mrs. Turner," someone told the woman and her face brightened in the dusk that settled around picturesque Castle Gate Rock.

A few minutes later word came that her three sons and son-in-law were victims. The aged woman collapsed and the cries of the four wives were heard above the crowd.

Nine grandchildren, a bereaved daughter and three grief - stricken daughter-in-laws were all that she had to remind her, as she lay prostrate at her home, of the happier days when her life and family were young. - Price Sun



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